Events of 1905

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  • Events of 1905
    • June 1904-1905: Russo-Japanese War
      • Dec 1904:Major Strike at Putilov Steel Works in St Petersburg (workers)
        • Jan 1905: Fall of Port Arthur, Baltic Fleet were blocked in
          • Led to many strikes and had a direct impact on homefront
          • Nov 1904: Zemstvo Congress Banquet Campaign
            • Start to question the tsar and running of the country, want reforms (middle class)
            • Led to many strikes and had a direct impact on homefront
    • Nov 1904: Zemstvo Congress Banquet Campaign
      • Start to question the tsar and running of the country, want reforms (middle class)
    • Dec 1904:Major Strike at Putilov Steel Works in St Petersburg (workers)
      • Jan 1905: Fall of Port Arthur, Baltic Fleet were blocked in
      • All these events led to Bloody Sunday 9/22nd Jan
        • June 1904-1905: Russo-Japanese War
          • Father Gapon led 200,000 workers through the streets of St Petersburg to the Tsar's Winter Palace to give him their complaints
          • 96 killed and 333 wounded
        • Bloody Sunday led to strikes and over 500,000 workers went on strike
          • these were still unorganised
        • Feb 1905- Grand Duke Sergei assassinated (Tsars uncle) by member of the peoples will
        • April 1905: Jacqueries- Peasants attacking landlords
        • June 1905- Union of Unions formed and planned a General Strike to stop disorganised ones
        • May/June 1905: Battle of Tsushima and Baltic fleet was defeated
          • Crew of battleship Potemkin mutinied in support of striking workers
            • Army moved in and 2000 were killed, 3000 injured
        • August 1905- Railway workers strike which leads to a general strike
        • August 1905: Witte negotiates truce with Japan
        • August 1905: Trotsky sets up St Petersburg Soviet, rival to the tsar
        • October 1905: October Manifesto, Witte wrote this and the tsar sent it off
          • The tsar couldn't pass a law without the Duma's approval
          • End to censorship, opposition groups were allowed
          • This would only come into power if people stopped striking, which the majority did
          • In theory, the tsar's absolute power was given up
        • 1906- Fundamental Law: No law could be put in place without the tsar's approval
          • Absolute power was back
          • Manifesto was basically destroyed

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