Contraception

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  • Contraception
    • What is contraception?
      • Contraception is the deliberate prevention of pregnancy by preventing the egg from being fertilised or implanted
    • Male comdom
      • 98% effective
      • Free from family planning clinics
      • Widely available
      • May prevent transmission of STDs
      • May split/come off/not be put on correctly
    • Female comdom
      • 95% effective
      • May prevent transmission of STDs
      • Expensive
      • Penis must enter the condom, not the vagina
    • Diaphragm
      • 92-96% effective
      • Wide variety available
      • No health risks from side effects
      • Must stay in place 6 hours after intercourse
      • Needs fitting by a doctor and checked regularly
    • IUD
      • 98-99% effective
      • Works immediately
      • Can stay in place for 3-10 years
      • Needs to be fitted by doctor
      • Sometimes comes out
      • Can cause heavier, more painful periods
    • IUS
      • 99+% effective
      • Works immediately
      • Can stay in place for 5 years
      • Reduces heavy periods
      • Needs to be fitted by doctor
      • Side effects may include acne or tender breasts
    • Combined pill
      • Easily taken orally
      • Needs a prescription
      • Unreliable if not taken at the same time every day
      • Vomiting, diarrhoea and antibiotics make it unreliable
      • 100%
    • Contraceptive implant
      • Effective for up to 3 years
      • Fertility returns immediately if removed
      • Can be difficult to remove
      • May cause irregular or excessive bleeding
      • 99% effective
    • Contraceptive injection
      • Effective for 2-3 months
      • No counteraction if woman changes her mind
      • Fertilitymay take up to 18 months to return
      • May cause irregular bleeding
      • 99% effective

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