Cognitive model for gambling addiction

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  • Created by: Grace
  • Created on: 02-05-13 19:07
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  • Cognitive model for gambling addiction
    • INITIATION = SELF MEDICATION
      • Gelkopf states that individuals intentionally use forms of pathological behaviour to treat the psychological symptoms which they suffer . People will only shose a particular activity if it looks like it will help with the issues they have. For example gambling is associated with poverty - gambling is judged to make things better and becomes an addiction.
        • SUPPORT = Li et al = found that compared to pathological gamblers who gambled for pure pleasure, pathological gamblers who gambled to escape painful reality were much more likely to have other substance dependencies.
          • Deterministic - not all people who gamble have money issues. Some rich people can start that leads to money issues due to the addiction.
    • MAINTENANCE = The role of irrational beliefs
      • These are cognitive distortions, they have irrational beliefs about their ability to influence the outcome of the gambling even though they are based on chance. One is 'gamblers fallacy' where recent events influence it, lots of losses so the next must be a win to balance it. Another is illusions of control where they believe that success is due to skill and ability and failure is due to bad luck.
        • SUPPORT = Griffiths compared 30 regular gamblers with 30 non reg. Reg believed they were more skilled and treated the machine like a person. They justified their losses as 'near wins which justified continuation.
    • RELAPSE = Just World hypothesis
      • Pathological gamblers tend to have 'recall bias' where they overestimate wins and rationalising losses. Because of this a string of losses does not act as a disincentive for future gambling. they believe they wil eventually be rewarded and 'deserve to win'
        • On the other hand = Delfabbro et al found that pathological gamblers were more irrational in some forms of gambling related cognition but were just as accurate as non gamblers in estimating the odds of winning.  This would suggest other reasons for relapse.
    • Supports better treatment as it will try and find the underlying cause and treat that to stop them from gambling.
      • Cognitive therapies can try to stop these faulty functions in the way they think and therefore stop relapse.
  • These are cognitive distortions, they have irrational beliefs about their ability to influence the outcome of the gambling even though they are based on chance. One is 'gamblers fallacy' where recent events influence it, lots of losses so the next must be a win to balance it. Another is illusions of control where they believe that success is due to skill and ability and failure is due to bad luck.
    • SUPPORT = Griffiths compared 30 regular gamblers with 30 non reg. Reg believed they were more skilled and treated the machine like a person. They justified their losses as 'near wins which justified continuation.

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