BONAR LAW/ BALDWIN 1922-1924

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  • Created by: Kimmy
  • Created on: 30-05-13 11:16
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  • Bonar Law/Baldwin 1922-1924
    • 1922 Election.
      • Conservative win: Andrew Bonar Law (coalition)
    • 1923 - Baldwin
      • Won 38% popular vote (258 seats)
      • Campaign = free trade. BUT needed to pay off war debts to USA.
        • Negotiated £46m per annum for 62 years
          • ANSWER: public spending cuts and protective tariffs.
      • Legislation:
        • Housing Act 1923/24
          • Housing subsidies from government grant.
    • Why lose 1923 election to Labour?
      • Stanley Baldwin
        • Politically naive - didn't speculate moving forward of election
          • Organisation of Party
            • timing issues - organisers no time prepare professional campiagn
              • SELDON: represented serious failure of leadership on Baldwin's part.
            • no time to win over press
              • DAILY MAIL: Baldwin's statements on tariffs didn't go far enough
            • confused and unprepared
        • SELDON: represented serious failure of leadership on Baldwin's part.
      • Organisation of Party
        • timing issues - organisers no time prepare professional campiagn
          • no time to win over press
            • DAILY MAIL: Baldwin's statements on tariffs didn't go far enough
          • confused and unprepared
        • Policies
          • Cutting welfare measures - highly unpopular
          • introduction of tariffs and free trade to protect industry and combat unemployment.
            • 1923: unemployment > 1m
          • SELDON: policy poorly worked out/conservatives vulnerable to change
        • External
          • unemployment
            • 1923: unemployment > 1m
          • Electorate: no one 100% certain. Depression = uncertainty
          • reunited Liberal party appealed to public with free trade policy

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