4. Parish, Community and the Emergence of Protestantism

  • Created by: Alasdair
  • Created on: 25-05-19 19:56
View mindmap
  • 4. Parish, Community and the Emergence of Protestantism
    • 1. Intro
      • Parishes gain new powers, religious and secular
      • Potential for unifying local society?
      • Division within parishes
        • the role of religion
      • Key concepts:
        • 'Triumph of laity'
        • 'Godly magistracy'
    • 2. Social and religious functions of parish
      • Central government requires parish takes on more responsibilities
      • Churchwardens (2 wardens who serve 2 years and from middling origins)
        • Monitor peoples' religion (church attendance, keep an eye for Catholics not attending)
        • Churchwardens required to report on parish to local bishop
      • Church used to keep firefighting equipment (not in main church)
      • First purpose built parish churches
      • Church building
        • Where parish gather for various things
        • Venue of rites of passage (baptism, church services, marriages, burials)
        • Church pews
          • Aristocracy would always sit at front, poorer people at the back or standing. Pews given to church wardens.
          • Reflects social hierarchies
        • Control over parish government
          • especially via new group called the vestry
        • Monuments
      • The building block of English society
      • The 'secular' parish
      • The 'ecclesiastical' parish
        • Monitors religious conformity
        • Churchwardens required to report on the parish to local bishop
      • Functions of parish church
        • A hub of local activity
        • Source of news
        • Administrative usage
    • 3. Power of clergy and power of lay people - what sort of balance under Protestantism
      • Laypeople
        • anyone who wasn't a member of clergy
      • Clergy are ordained, spiritually different, can say prayers for you after you die.
      • Lay people less dependent on clergy
      • A triumph of the laity
        • More well to do people can afford lectureships influence
          • A triumph of the better off? i.e. middling sort, gentry and aristocracy
      • Lay people could pay priest to give sermons they want (lectureships)
      • The Post-Reformation Clergy
        • clerical wealth and status declines in Elizabeth's reign, but increasing in early C17th
      • Elizabeth would make money from leaving bishoprics free
      • New generation of clergy who had been to university displacing bishops from previous generations
      • Spiritual equality?
      • Lay power over the clergy
        • Sometimes control appointment of parish clergy (advowsons)
        • Control money (income from church land and tithes) lay impropriators (laymen keeping money from tithes)
        • Other religious control
          • e.g. can choose to pay for lectureships (hiring a minister to provide extra preaching)
    • 4. Religious 'flavour' of parishes
      • Local gentry can influence parishes
        • e.g. Catholic gentry may influence parish to be less anti-Catholic, or Puritan gentry could influence Parish in opposite direction.
      • 1570s, Bishop Curteys of Chichester starts trying to crack down on Catholic nobles resulting in Elizabeth having to tell him to back off due to Elizabeth being newly established and requiring support
    • 5. Concept of 'Godly magistracy'
      • Phenomenon noted by Patrick Collinson
      • Puritanism and social control?
        • religious factors OR social/economic ones (Margaret Spufford)
      • Festive culture - suppression and revival
    • 6. The early modern parish
      • Divisions and alliances
      • Each parish has a different configuration, we must also take into account regional difference

Comments

No comments have yet been made

Similar History resources:

See all History resources »See all A Protestant Nation resources »