woman in black

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Throughout the text Hill has used a variety of gothic features to have an effect on the readers equilibrium, by this i mean Hill creates deep uncertainty within each character
For example, as Kipps speaks with Mr Daily and is asked if he is going to attend the funeral, Kipps’ motive, in the positive, results in a negative response where Mr Daily says “You’ll be about the only one who is.” Daily pessimistically states that
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no one in the village will ever look upon the late Mrs Drablow. This maybe because of the unwillingness to listen for his ' Londoners superiority' will overlook the circumstance or Mr Daily wants to protect him from the ghastly woman in black.
Furthermore Kipps wants to find out more about the woman and the house, out of professional curiosity, the responses from Daily are short and without any real intent; one or two word answers with little detail. Even when Kipps tries to inject humour
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into the dialogue by asking ‘Come’, you’re not going to start telling me strange tales of lonely houses?’ the answer he receives is definite and negative.
Either way, the fear is evident for the reader to see and this continues later, as Kipps is with Keckwick, the pony and trap driver. He sees the fear exhibited in one more of the locals as he asks more about Mrs Drablow and Eel Marsh House.
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Something very strange and disconcerting happens to Kipps and he wants to discuss the matter with Keckwick, but Keckwick turns away and climbs “into the driving seat” of the trap. The fact that he looks straight ahead of himself, almost like the sol
ier’s thousand yard stare” in stressed victims, allows the reader to see that he fears something that maybe cannot be explained, something that is dangerous and malevolent, supernatural in its entirety and something that is best left alone.
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Each character responds in such a vague manner that the reader, by this point, is asking questions at the turn of every page. Hill is very successful in showing the fear of these extremely superstitious people who live in Crythin Gifford.
The use of time in the chapter follows gothic conventions of novels like Frankenstein where the framing narrative sets up a contrast between now: a ruined man, and the past where a young, whole, hearty man rushes towards a terrible fate.
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Card 2

Front

Furthermore Kipps wants to find out more about the woman and the house, out of professional curiosity, the responses from Daily are short and without any real intent; one or two word answers with little detail. Even when Kipps tries to inject humour

Back

no one in the village will ever look upon the late Mrs Drablow. This maybe because of the unwillingness to listen for his ' Londoners superiority' will overlook the circumstance or Mr Daily wants to protect him from the ghastly woman in black.

Card 3

Front

Either way, the fear is evident for the reader to see and this continues later, as Kipps is with Keckwick, the pony and trap driver. He sees the fear exhibited in one more of the locals as he asks more about Mrs Drablow and Eel Marsh House.

Back

Preview of the back of card 3

Card 4

Front

ier’s thousand yard stare” in stressed victims, allows the reader to see that he fears something that maybe cannot be explained, something that is dangerous and malevolent, supernatural in its entirety and something that is best left alone.

Back

Preview of the back of card 4

Card 5

Front

The use of time in the chapter follows gothic conventions of novels like Frankenstein where the framing narrative sets up a contrast between now: a ruined man, and the past where a young, whole, hearty man rushes towards a terrible fate.

Back

Preview of the back of card 5

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