Themes

HideShow resource information
Darcy (Pride)
From the beginning, Darcy is shown to be too proud of his own social standing. He looks down on people, especially the Bennets. This is made worse by his natural quietness, which makes him seem even more aloof.
1 of 9
Elizabeth (Pride)
Elizabeth isn't naturally proud in the same sense as Darcy. But when she's slighted by him at the first ball, her pride is hurt. As a result, she compensates by becoming more proud of herself and defensive about her family.
2 of 9
Lady Catherine (Pride)
Lady Catherine is incredibly proud, believing it to be the natural order of things that she be praised and obeyed.
3 of 9
Mr Collins (Pride)
Collins' pride changes according to whom he's speaking. In the company of people he believes to be below him socially, he revels in taking the moral high ground and bragging about his standing. With those above him, his pride vanishes and he often hu
4 of 9
Darcy (Prejudice)
Without knowing the Bennets - or almost anyone else, for that matter - Darcy seems to form opinions without taking the trouble to get to know them.
5 of 9
Elizabeth (Prejudice)
Again, prejudice isn't Elizabeth's natural outlook. However, when Darcy offends her, she allows everything to feed the prejudice she develops against him. She's prepared to believe anything bad about him to fuel the impression she wants to create (fo
6 of 9
Mrs Bennet (Prejudice)
Mrs Bennet develops a more blatant prejudice against Darcy after his actions at the ball. She acts on this, insulting him within earshot. Her character's lack of depth is shown by her prejudice disappearing when Darcy proposes to Elizabeth.
7 of 9
Lady Catherine (Prejudice)
She's prejudiced against anyone below her in social standing, unless they're prepared to play by her rules (that is, what she says goes). So she's prepared to tolerate Collins, but despises Elizabeth.
8 of 9
The Bennet Sisters (Prejudice)
Mrs Hurst and Miss Bingley are prejudiced against Jane and Elizabeth. This is mainly out of self-interest. They dislike Jane because they feel she isn't good enough for their brother; they dislike Elizabeth because Darcy likes her and Miss Bingley wa
9 of 9

Other cards in this set

Card 2

Front

Elizabeth isn't naturally proud in the same sense as Darcy. But when she's slighted by him at the first ball, her pride is hurt. As a result, she compensates by becoming more proud of herself and defensive about her family.

Back

Elizabeth (Pride)

Card 3

Front

Lady Catherine is incredibly proud, believing it to be the natural order of things that she be praised and obeyed.

Back

Preview of the back of card 3

Card 4

Front

Collins' pride changes according to whom he's speaking. In the company of people he believes to be below him socially, he revels in taking the moral high ground and bragging about his standing. With those above him, his pride vanishes and he often hu

Back

Preview of the back of card 4

Card 5

Front

Without knowing the Bennets - or almost anyone else, for that matter - Darcy seems to form opinions without taking the trouble to get to know them.

Back

Preview of the back of card 5
View more cards

Comments

No comments have yet been made

Similar English Literature resources:

See all English Literature resources »See all Pride and Prejudice resources »