Section 21 Blackmail Theft Act 1968

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  • Created by: qwerty123
  • Created on: 19-03-16 08:57
What is the definition of S.21 Blackmail?
This is where the defendant intentionally makes an unwarranted demand with menaces with an intent to gain for himself/another or cause loss to another.
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What section of the Theft Act is Blackmail?
Section 21
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Which case says that a demand can be implied if a reasonable person looking on would think it was?
Collister v Warhurst
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Which case says you have to have done everything possible to make the demand?
Treacey
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What does Thorne say menaces means?
Anything unpleasant or detrimental to the person being threatened.
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Which case says the menaces cant be too mild?
Harry
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Which case says that menaces can be something that affects a person that would be easily influenced if the person making the threat realises they will be easily influenced?
Garwood
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Which case says that threatening someone to give them a pain relieving injection was intent to gain for himself?
Bevans
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What is the first part of the defence for Blackmail?
Did the defendant believe he had reasonable grounds for making the demand?
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What is the second part of the defence for Blackmail?
Honest belief that the menaces were proper means of enforcing the demand?
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Which case says that 'proper' means cant include unlawful acts?
Harvey
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Card 2

Front

What section of the Theft Act is Blackmail?

Back

Section 21

Card 3

Front

Which case says that a demand can be implied if a reasonable person looking on would think it was?

Back

Preview of the front of card 3

Card 4

Front

Which case says you have to have done everything possible to make the demand?

Back

Preview of the front of card 4

Card 5

Front

What does Thorne say menaces means?

Back

Preview of the front of card 5
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