Rag Desh - QUIZ

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The melody is based on a rag (this is a pattern of notes, like a scale). Different rags are associated with certain:
Seasons
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The rhythmic pattern played underneath is based on a tal. What is a tal?
A cycle of beats repeated and improvised during the piece.
2 of 24
The first beat in a tal is called the sam. It is often _______ by the musicians.
Stressed
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Rag Desh is almost like a C major scale. On the way back down some different pitches are used and one note is changed. Which note is changed and to what?
B - Bb
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Rag Desh is associated with the late evening and _________ season.
Monsoon
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Performances of a rag are usually in 3 parts, progressing from slow to fast tempo. These sections are (in this order):
Alap, Gat, Jhalla.
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The Alap is the slow introductory section. The notes and mood of the rag are introduced against a drone. There is no regular ______ and no percussion.
Pulse
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The Gat is a fixed composition that is improvised on by the solo instrument. The percussion also enters and the pulse is clear and fixed. What is the solo instrument in Rag Desh?
Sitar
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The Jhalla is the final section, much faster than the previous two. The music becomes more virtuosic and _________.
Decorative
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Anoushka Shankar performs Rag Desh. She plays the:
Sitar
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The Tabla are used to play the Gat. The right one is smaller, higher pitched and wooden, and the left one is larger, lower pitched and metal. The left is called the ______ and the right is called the ______.
Left = Bayan Right = Dayan
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The two tals used in Rag Desh are the Jhaptal and the Tintal. The Jhaptal is a 10 beat cycle and the Tintal is a ___ beat cycle.
16
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Which is the only instrument to play in the Alap?
Sitar
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The sitar introduces the notes and mood of the rag. The melodic line is decorated with slides and pitch bends called:
meends
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The sitar's improvisations in the Gat are based on the fixed composition (gat). The tabla's improvisations are based on the tal. The improvisations end with a tihai (a short melody or rhythm played ___ times and ending on the first note [sam]).
3
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Towards the end of the gat, the tempo:
Increases
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The strings of the sitar are _______ in the jhalla to create "rhythmic excitement".
Strummed
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'Mhara janam maran' is another version of Rag Desh. It is a 'bhajan' =
A Hindu devotional song
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'Mhara janam maran' is performed by Chiranji Lal Tanwar. He is accompanied by the sarod, the sarangi, the pakhawaj, the tabla and a small pair of cymbals. This piece uses an ___ beat cycle called the keherwa tal.
8
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This version only has two sections. The Alap and the:
Bhajan
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The last version of Rag Desh is performed by Steve Gorn and Benjy Wertheimer. They are _________ musicians.
American
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The instruments used in Gorn and Wertheimer's version of Rag Desh are quite different to the original. They use a ________: a bamboo flute with holes instead of keys.
Bansuri
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There are two tals in Gorn and Wertheimer's version of Rag Desh. These are the Rupak tal (7 beat cycle) and the Ektal (__ beat cycle).
12
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The structure of Gorn and Wertheimer's version of Rag Desh is Alap, ____ 1 and ____ 2
Gat
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Other cards in this set

Card 2

Front

The rhythmic pattern played underneath is based on a tal. What is a tal?

Back

A cycle of beats repeated and improvised during the piece.

Card 3

Front

The first beat in a tal is called the sam. It is often _______ by the musicians.

Back

Preview of the front of card 3

Card 4

Front

Rag Desh is almost like a C major scale. On the way back down some different pitches are used and one note is changed. Which note is changed and to what?

Back

Preview of the front of card 4

Card 5

Front

Rag Desh is associated with the late evening and _________ season.

Back

Preview of the front of card 5
View more cards

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