Pilgrimage of Grace

  • Created by: TessAni
  • Created on: 14-04-13 18:55
When did the Pilgrimage of Grace begin?
8th October 1536 inspired by the Lincolnshire rebellion
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Where did it begin? Under whose lead?
South Yorkshire under the control fo Robert Aske (from a leading Yorkshire family but a lawyer who had experiences of London as well as the north) and brilliant at propaganda
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What happened first?
16th October Aske with a force of 10,000 men entered York where they were welcomed and the mayor hadned over the town
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At its height how many regional armies were there?
nine regional armies in the north covering Northumberland, Durham, North Yorkshire and Cumberland
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How many men did they manage to gather?
30,000 well-armed men
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Which nobles were involved?
Lord Latimer, a Neville and member of the Council of the North, and Sir Christopher Danby took Barnard Castle and then proceeded to pillage the Bishop Tunstall of Durham’s castle at Bishop Auckland.
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Where remained loyal?
Lancashire, Scarborough, Skipton Castle, Berwick and Carlisle.
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Why was Henry slow to respond?
Royal forces were not prepared for such a large scale rising, peaceful element made it difficult, many of Henry’s forces being still in Lincolnshire dealing with the aftermath of the troubles there
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Which royal forces were able to act?
Earl of Shrewsbury in Nottingham
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What was significant about Lord Darcy?
He held the important royal castle of Pontefract. He sent south for help but surrendered on 21st October without a single blow. Darcy’s support for the rising and his production of badges for the pilgrims confirmed Henry’s fears about the loyalty.
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What happened next at Pontefract?
October 27th Duke of Norfolk + 8,000 men arrived; entered negotiations (24 Pontefract Articles) and it was agreed they would send two representatives to London to present their demands to the king
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How did Henry react?
Henry rejected the demands stating they were too vague while promising a pardon to all except the ringleaders. At the same time he instructed Norfolk to agree in order to buy time. Bowes and Ellerker returned promising the king's good faith.
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What happened next?
Aske, Darcy and the rest drew up the revised 24 articles, brought them to Norfolk. He promised the issues would be discussed in a parliament in the north. Aske announced to the pilgrims that they had won a great victory. The pilgrims dispersed.
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What did Aske do next?
He travelled to London at the king's request and was received with honour falling for a confidence trick.
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What happened when he returned?
January 1537 the commons rose under Sir Francis Bigod - planned to capture Hull and Scarborough
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What did this allow Henry to do?
Norfolk defeated the rebels in an attack at Carlisle. Martial law was declared and 74 were hanged. Gentry leaders were rounded up, taken to London for trial and another 100 lost their lives including Darcy, Aske and Hussey.
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What were differences between the Pilgrimage and 1537?
Bigod was not a catholic but an evangelical, he realised that Henry had no intention of keeping his word and was therefore determined to start a new rising to ensure that the area’s grievances were taken seriously
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Other cards in this set

Card 2

Front

Where did it begin? Under whose lead?

Back

South Yorkshire under the control fo Robert Aske (from a leading Yorkshire family but a lawyer who had experiences of London as well as the north) and brilliant at propaganda

Card 3

Front

What happened first?

Back

Preview of the front of card 3

Card 4

Front

At its height how many regional armies were there?

Back

Preview of the front of card 4

Card 5

Front

How many men did they manage to gather?

Back

Preview of the front of card 5
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