Media theories

Claude Levi-Strauss (Binary Opposition)
Most texts can be considered as simple conflicts (binary opposites) which drive the narrative forward and position the audience to support a particular ideological standpoint
1 of 18
Jean Baudrillard (Postmodernism)
Modern audiences are so immersed in the media that it is no longer possible to tell reality from simulacra (fake news)
2 of 18
Steve Neale (Genre theory)
Genres may be dominated by repetition of ideas, images and themes, but they also develop and evolve
3 of 18
Tzvetan Todorov (Narrative theory)
All narratives follow a similar structure, which, simplistically, is: equilibrium/disequilibrium/restored equilibrium
4 of 18
Stuart Hall (Reception theory)
Producers encode a text, audiences decode it in one of three ways (dominant/negotiated/oppositional)
5 of 18
Albert Bandura (Media Effects)
'Deviant' behaviour (violence/drug-taking etc.) encourages copycat behaviour in the viewer
6 of 18
Clay Shirky (End of Audience)
Due to technological advances, audiences can no longer be thought of as passive consumers
7 of 18
Henry Jenkins (Fandoms)
Fandoms present a sense of identity for audiences. Fans are increasingly influential in the creation of textual meaning.
8 of 18
Liesbet Van Zoonen (Feminist theory)
Men and women are represented in different ways by the media. Female objectification is linked to historical, patriarchal culture.
9 of 18
Judith Butler (Gender Performativity)
Men and women 'perform' their gender roles based on concepts of cultural norms which are reinforced by the media
10 of 18
David Gauntlett (Pick&Mix theory)
We build our sense of identity partly through media representations. Media representations are becoming increasingly diverse
11 of 18
George Gerbner (Cultivation theory)
Repeated representations in the media lead people to change the way they view the world around them
12 of 18
Paul Gilroy (Ethnicity and Postcolonial theory)
Modern ideas about race and ethnicity are bound up in historical ideas of colonialism. Ethnicity and race is often represented as being different or 'other'.
13 of 18
Stuart Hall (Representation)
Stereotypes are used in the media, often to represent minority groups. The media creates stereotypes through a system of signification.
14 of 18
Bell Hooks (Feminist theory)
Feminism is a political aim rather than an individual lifestyle. Gender, class and race determine the extent to which individuals are discriminated against.
15 of 18
Curran and Seaton (Power and Media Industries)
The media is owned and controlled by a small number of companies who are driven by profit and power
16 of 18
David Hesmondhalgh (Cultural Industries)
The largest media companies use vertical and horizontal integration across a range of industries in order to increase profit
17 of 18
Livingstone and Lunt (Regulation)
There is constant conflict between the freedoms of speech and expressions and the need to restrict views that could incite hatred or violence
18 of 18

Other cards in this set

Card 2

Front

Modern audiences are so immersed in the media that it is no longer possible to tell reality from simulacra (fake news)

Back

Jean Baudrillard (Postmodernism)

Card 3

Front

Genres may be dominated by repetition of ideas, images and themes, but they also develop and evolve

Back

Preview of the back of card 3

Card 4

Front

All narratives follow a similar structure, which, simplistically, is: equilibrium/disequilibrium/restored equilibrium

Back

Preview of the back of card 4

Card 5

Front

Producers encode a text, audiences decode it in one of three ways (dominant/negotiated/oppositional)

Back

Preview of the back of card 5
View more cards

Comments

No comments have yet been made

Similar Media Studies resources:

See all Media Studies resources »See all Theories resources »