King Lear - Critics

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  • Created by: OliviaEOC
  • Created on: 27-05-15 14:28
Dr Johnson
'the wicked prosper and the virtuous miscarry'
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Cunningham
Gloucester finds 'insight through blindness' and Lear 'wisdom through madness'
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Emma Smith
'a Christian play about a Pagan world'
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William Hazlitt
'it is his rash haste, his violent impetuosity, his blindness to everything but the dictates of his passions or affections that produces all his misfortunes'
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John Ellis
'the subplot in Shakespeare's King Lear' 'comments by parallel and contrast not only on the main plot but also on the character of Lear'
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Nicholas Brooke
'A bleating Lear' 'a senile fool' 'is fatal to the scene'
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Harold Bloom
'The descent from Monarch to unaccommodated Man thus conveys most potently man's fragility, fallibility and fatality'
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Walter Stein
'The world remains what it was, a merciless, heartbreaking world. Lear has been broken by it, but he has learned to love and be loved'
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Robert Heilman
Lear 'feels compassion, acknowledges his own failures and lessens himself in terms of divine justice'
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Jonathen Dollimore
'demented mumbling interspersed with brief insight'
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Goldsmith
the Fool is Lear's 'alter-ego, his externalised conscience'
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Welsford
'an all licensed critic who sees and speaks the real truth about the people around him'
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Colin McGinn
'A shadow is the closest thing to nothingness a person can be, without losing being altogether'
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M. D. Faber
'Gonerill is driven by her appetites; she is void of innocence; she is cruel, cunning, Machiavellian, murderous'
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Terrence Hawkes
Cordelia 'seizes the fact that the true sense of love implies something which is impossible to conceive of'
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Carolyn S. French
The Fool is 'a true innocent whose wisdom is obviously not his own making'
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Betty Kantor Stuart
'Lear would rather have flattery than truth'
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Martin Esslin
in Shakespeare's plays 'the same type of inverted logical reasoning, false syllogism, free association and the poetry of real or feigned madness' is used
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Rebecca Warren
'many critics see Lear's insanity as a learning process'
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William Hazlitt
'We see at once' 'the hollowness of her sisters' pretensions'
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Schlegel
Lear experiences 'a fall from the highest elevation, into the deepest abyss of misery'
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G. Wilson Knight
'a purgatorial process to self-knowledge'
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Jeffrey Hatcher
'the themes of the subplot - rejection, forgiveness, parents turning against children and children against parents, complement those of the main plot'
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Ian House
'all the characters of the play are, at some point and in some sense, outsiders, cut off from society by the cruelty of others or by their own folly or inhumanity'
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Ann Thompson
'ideas about distributive justice in families lead to ideas about distributive justice in society'
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Card 2

Front

Gloucester finds 'insight through blindness' and Lear 'wisdom through madness'

Back

Cunningham

Card 3

Front

'a Christian play about a Pagan world'

Back

Preview of the back of card 3

Card 4

Front

'it is his rash haste, his violent impetuosity, his blindness to everything but the dictates of his passions or affections that produces all his misfortunes'

Back

Preview of the back of card 4

Card 5

Front

'the subplot in Shakespeare's King Lear' 'comments by parallel and contrast not only on the main plot but also on the character of Lear'

Back

Preview of the back of card 5
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