King Lear Critics

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Marilyn French
[When women behave like men] it topples the natural order and plunges the world into chaos
1 of 21
Jan Kott
There is nothing, except the cruel earth where man goes on his journey from cradle to grave
2 of 21
The business of the gods ... was not to torment him ... but lead him to attain the very end and aim of life
A.C. Bradley
3 of 21
Marjorie Garber
The fool is a mirror ... reflecting back at Lear his own concealed image
4 of 21
G.B. Harrison
He effected a grim irony through the use of two words which sound throughout the play like the tolling of a knell: 'nature' and 'nothing'
5 of 21
Edmund is essentially an actor, who uses the language of the old order ... for his own political ambitions
Charles Beauclerk
6 of 21
A.M. Colman
In such a world, where the gods are absent, Gloucester's suffering must inspire pity
7 of 21
Anna Hermesmann
There is no just force to establish an objective morality
8 of 21
Charles Hanly (about Lear's love test)
Nothing could be more threatening to a daughter than the demand that Lear makes ... Goneril and Regan are confronted by a father whose love for them is eroticised
9 of 21
Lear's madness is a device for stripping way the narcissistic illusory aspects of royalty
Charles Hanly
10 of 21
This new language of compassion proclaims a new social order, founded on the politics of love
Charles Beauclerk
11 of 21
Adrian Ingham
Timothie Bright's 'unnatural melancholie'
12 of 21
Howard Furness
So carelessly hurried over that it comes to nothing ... its own unimpressiveness makes insignificant everything that has reference to it
13 of 21
Nancy Maguire
His attempt to redeem his lonely self is a gesture which conveys his suffering as an individual
14 of 21
The gouging out of Gloucester's eyes is a thing unnecessary, crude, and disgusting. It helps provide an accompanying exaggeration of one element ... in the horror that makes Lear's madness.
L.C. Knight
15 of 21
The sheer fact of the blinding, and our sheer horrified rejection of it as unendurable, stand at the very centre of the play
S.L. Goldberg
16 of 21
Kathleen Mcluskie
Goneril and Regan are presented as demons, monsters, anything but human ... women in power can only bring disgrace
17 of 21
SL Bethell
Lear, after being bound upon a wheel of fire, attaining patience and humility, is fit for heaven
18 of 21
Frank Kermode
Shakespeare concerns himself with the contrast between the two bodies of the king. One lives by ceremony, administering justice in distinguished regalia which set him above nature. The other is born naked, subject to disease and pain.
19 of 21
Algernon Swinburne
The doctrine of Shakespeare is darker in its implication of injustice, its acceptance of accident ... righteousness itself seems subject and subordinate to the masterdom of fate
20 of 21
G. Wilson Knight
The tragedy is most poignant in that it is purposeless, unreasonable
21 of 21

Other cards in this set

Card 2

Front

There is nothing, except the cruel earth where man goes on his journey from cradle to grave

Back

Jan Kott

Card 3

Front

A.C. Bradley

Back

Preview of the back of card 3

Card 4

Front

The fool is a mirror ... reflecting back at Lear his own concealed image

Back

Preview of the back of card 4

Card 5

Front

He effected a grim irony through the use of two words which sound throughout the play like the tolling of a knell: 'nature' and 'nothing'

Back

Preview of the back of card 5
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