Childhood - Theory

Childhood - for the 2015 AQA Specification.

This set of flashcards is for theory, The sociologists are in a different set.

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  • Created by: shyde7
  • Created on: 20-04-16 12:55
Name three ways in which 'separateness' of children is emphasized through law.
Through laws regulating what children are allowed, required and forbidden to do.
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Name two ways in which 'separateness' of children is emphasized apart from law?
Through dress, toys and books available.
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Childhood is known as the '_ age'.
Golden age - of happiness and innocence.
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What is the consequence of children's percieved innocence for children?
Children are seen as vulnerable and in need of protection. They should be kept 'quarantined'.
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What is the consequence of children's perceived innocence for the family?
Children's lives are largely regulated by the family and education, where adult provide for them and protect them. They lead lives that consist largely of play and leisure.
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Why is childhood not universal?
While all humans go through the same stages of physical development, different cultures define this process differently.
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When did the modern notion of childhood begin to emerge?
13th Century.
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Why were schools important to the emergence of childhood?
Because schools came to specialise solely in education of the young. This reflected the church's influence, which saw children as fragile and in need of protecting.
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When was the distinction made between children's and adult's clothing and in what way?
The 17th century. By this time, upper class boys were expected to dress in an outfit that was reserved for his own age group, that set him apart from the adults.
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The growing number of handbooks on childrearing in the 18th century is a sign of what?
Growing child-centredness of the family, especially among middle classes.
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How did law restricting child labour change the position of children in the 20th C?
Children became an economic liability, financially dependent on their parents.
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What were the Children Act and the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child (1989)?
The Children Act states that parents have responsibilities in relation to children rather than rights. and the UNCRC (1989) lays down basic rights, e.g. access to healthcare and education, protection from abuse and right to participate in decisions.
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Why were this Act and Convention important?
Because they allowed children to be come even more protected and separated from adults, once again reinforcing the idea of childhood.
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Which demographic aspects have had an impact on the changing position of children?
Declining family size and lower infant mortality have encouraged parents to make a greater financial and emotional investment in children.
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How did medicine change the position of children?
Donzelot (1977) observes how theories of child development stressed how children need supervision and protection.
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What argument's are there against Jenks' assumption that childhood has changed because of society's instability?
Jenks overgeneralises. With growing family diversity in modern society, it is impossible to say that the experience of all, or even most, children experience childhood the same way.
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Other cards in this set

Card 2

Front

Name two ways in which 'separateness' of children is emphasized apart from law?

Back

Through dress, toys and books available.

Card 3

Front

Childhood is known as the '_ age'.

Back

Preview of the front of card 3

Card 4

Front

What is the consequence of children's percieved innocence for children?

Back

Preview of the front of card 4

Card 5

Front

What is the consequence of children's perceived innocence for the family?

Back

Preview of the front of card 5
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