B4c: Leaves and photosynthesis

To most teenagers, plants are there to be eaten and sometimes admired for their colourful flowers. This item seeks to consolidate understanding of how green plants work. Preparing and examining slides of leaves provides the opportunity to work accurately and safely and present information using scientific and mathematical conventions. 

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Why are chloroplasts not found in all plant cells?
Light doesn't reach certain points of the plant (roots) so there is no point, as it would be impossible to photosynthesise.
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Where are chlorophyll pigments found and what do they do?
Found in chloroplasts and absorb light energy for photosynthesis.
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Where is the entry point for water in a plant?
Through root hairs.
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Where is the entry point for carbon dioxide in a plant?
Through stomata.
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Where does the waste product of photosynthesis oxygen exit?
Through stomata.
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Which leaf is better for photosynthesis? Broad or narrow? Why?
Broad to an able more sunlight to be absorbed.
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Name the eight parts of a leaf starting at the top.
Waxy cuticle, upper epidermis, palisade mesophyll layer, spongy mesophyll layer/vasuclar bundle, lower epidermis, guard cells, and stomata.
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Explain six ways how plants are adapted for efficient photosynthesis.
Thin, contain lots of chlorophyll and other pigments, network of vascular bundles, guard cells, broad and stomata.
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Why are plants that are effective at photosynthesis thin?
So there is a short distance for carbon dioxide to diffuse into the leaf.
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Why do plants that contain lots of chlorophyll and other pigments effective at photosynthesis?
They can absorb light from different parts of the Sun's spectrum.
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Why do plants with a network of vascular bundles effective at photosynthesis?
They can support the leaf, and transport water and carbohydrates.
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Why are plants that contain stomata effective at photosynthesis?
They allow carbon dioxide to diffuse into the leaf.
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Why are plants that have guard cells effective at photosynthesis?
They open and close the stomata depending on the conditions.
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What four parts of the inside of a leaf are adapted for efficient photosynthesis?
Epidermis is transparent, palisade mesophyll layer at the top containing most of the chloroplasts, spongy layer with airspaces and internal surface to value ratio very high.
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Why is the epidermis transparent?
To allow more light to reach the palisade mesophyll cells.
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Why is the palisade mesophyll cell layer at top of the leaf and why does it contain most of the chloroplasts?
To absorb more light.
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Why does the spongy mesophyll layer contain air spaces?
To allow carbon dioxide to diffuse from the stomata to the photosynthesising cells, and to provide a very large internal surface area to volume ratio.
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What four photosynthetic pigments do plants use to maximise the use of energy from the sun?
Chlorophyll a and b, xanthophyll and carotene.
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What photosynthetic pigment is the main one? What light regions of the spectrum does it absorb?
Chlorophyll a, absorbs mainly red and blue regions.
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What are chlorophyll b, carotene and xanthophyll known as? and what is their role?
They are know as accessary pigments, and they absorb light from regions of the spectrum chlorophyll a doesn't. They also pass energy onto chlorophyll a.
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Other cards in this set

Card 2

Front

Where are chlorophyll pigments found and what do they do?

Back

Found in chloroplasts and absorb light energy for photosynthesis.

Card 3

Front

Where is the entry point for water in a plant?

Back

Preview of the front of card 3

Card 4

Front

Where is the entry point for carbon dioxide in a plant?

Back

Preview of the front of card 4

Card 5

Front

Where does the waste product of photosynthesis oxygen exit?

Back

Preview of the front of card 5
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