A2 Section A - Fibres

Test questions for natural, synthetic, regenerated & inorganic fibres, with answers. :)

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Give 4 examples of animal fibres.
Examples include: silk, angora, wool, llama, cashmere, vicuna, mohair
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Give 3 examples of bast fibres.
Examples include: linen, ramie, hemp, jute, bamboo
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Give an example of seed fibres.
Cotton
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Give 2 examples of leaf fibres.
Banana, pineapple
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Give 2 examples of mineral fibres.
Silicate, asbestos
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Give 4 properties of wool fibres.
warm, soft, felts, natural crimp, water repellent, not easy to set alight, skrinks
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Give 3 properties of cellulose fibres.
easy to set alight, strong, good absorbency, creases, wash/iron at high temperatures
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Describe the cross section of cotton, and how this means cotton shrinks.
A dry cotton fibre is known as being mature, and immature when it is wet. It swells when it is wet, and causes it to shrink as the fibre becomes shorter.
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What properties does the cross section of silk give to the fibre?
(Triangular cross section) Lustre, softness
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What are the scales on a wool fibre covered in? What property does this give the fibre?
Lanolin; Water repellency
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Why do the scales on wool cause the fibre to shrink?
Scales open when wet and interlock.
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What is linen made from?
The flax plant
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What are the irregularities in linen called? What do they cause?
Nodes; slubs
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What are crystalline regions? What properties do they give to the fibre?
Tightly packed areas of a fibre, where molecules are highly oriented (in line, tightly packed); they are stronger areas of the fibre
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What are amorphous regions? What properties do they give to the fibre?
Looser, less oriented areas of the fibre where the molecules are not in line; these areas are weaker and more absorbent
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Give 3 examples of man made fibres.
Polyester, Nylon/Polyamide, PVC, Elastane, Chlorofibres, Acrylic
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Give 3 examples of regenerated/natural polymer fibres.
Modal, Cupro, Rubber, Viscose/Lyocell, Tencel, Acetate, Triacetate
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Give 4 examples of inorganic fibres.
Glass, ceramic, metallic, carbon
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Give 3 properties of viscose fibres.
Absorbent, creases, shrinks, weak when wet, silky feel
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Give 3 properties of synthetic fibres.
Strong, abrasion resistant, dries quickly, lightweight, doesn't shrink/crease, melts
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What machine is used to create synthetic fibres? How are they created?
Spinnerette; fluid pulled and stretched to create a fibre. As it is pulled, the molecules become more oriented.
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Describe the cross section of viscose.
Irregular due to 'striations' (grooves) along the length. It is smooth - reflects light
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Describe the cross section of synthetic fibres.
Circular, smooth - reflects light, poor insulator as doesn't trap air.
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How can nylon's cross section be modified? How does this change its properties?
It can be changed into a tri-lobal shape. It makes the fibre more comfortable as it has less contact with the skin.
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Give 2 properties of carbon fibres.
Expensive, thin, lightweight & strong, popular in military and motorsports
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Give 2 properties of ceramic fibres.
Help to regulate body temperature, UV protection properties, extremely lightweight, up to 1,000 degrees (C) temperature resistance
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Give 2 properties of metallic fibres.
Plastic coated metal, coated to prevent tarnishing, aluminium replaced gold & silver (cheaper)
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Give 2 properties of glass fibres.
Used for flame retardant fabrics, fine fibres of glass, used as insulation material
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Other cards in this set

Card 2

Front

Give 3 examples of bast fibres.

Back

Examples include: linen, ramie, hemp, jute, bamboo

Card 3

Front

Give an example of seed fibres.

Back

Preview of the front of card 3

Card 4

Front

Give 2 examples of leaf fibres.

Back

Preview of the front of card 4

Card 5

Front

Give 2 examples of mineral fibres.

Back

Preview of the front of card 5
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