The Holocaust

What is the Holocaust?
The horrific acts of the Holocaust (1933-1945) can be defined as a mass slaughter directed towards the Jewish community instructed by the German dictator Adolf hitter (who came to power in 1933) and his nazi party.

What is the history of antisemitism?
Defined as hostile actions or discrimination against Jews as a religious or ethnic group – goes back many centuries; antisemitism has been called "the longest hatred"- google

Jewish persecution (1933-1939)
The Nazis believed that the Germans were “racially superior” and they saw Jews, Roma (Gypsies), as a serious threat to the purity of the “German Race,” And in 1933 propaganda unfairly blamed Jews for the country’s defeat in World War I (1914-1918).
In April 1933, laws proclaimed at Nuremberg made Jews second-class citizens. The new German laws forced Jews out of their civil service jobs, university and law court positions, and other areas of public life. Between 1937 and 1939 Jews were no longer aloud to go to school, go to theatres, cinema, even walking in certain sections of German cities was banned.

The kristallnatch
In November 1938, the Nazis organized a riot, most commonly known as Kristallnacht (the “Night of Broken Glass”). Where they Destroyed synagogues and Jewish-owned stores and homes, as well as arresting many Jewish men which often lead to the murder of individuals.

Why didn’t more Jewish people leave?
Even when the attacking of Jewish citizens began to arise many Jews did not leave Germany. The most common reason was fear of Hitlers army if they were caught attempting to escape or even the fear of starting a new life over from scratch! Another common reason was that their freedom had already been taken away so many had no passports, money or rights! Many also felt that they could not leave due to their family history and felt that although they were Jewish they were more German and didn’t not want to give up their nationality. The final reason was because they would become refugees and it was often hard…

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