OCR AS ENGLISH LITERATURE - YEATS POETRY

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  • Created by: Jess
  • Created on: 19-05-12 13:50

 

 

 

 

 

                      Yeats Poetry Revision

 

 

1.     The Stolen Child

2.     The Cat and the Moon

 

3.     September 1913

4.     Easter 1916

5.     In Memory of Eva Gore-Booth and Con Markievicz

 

6.     The Cold Heaven

7.     Broken Dreams

 

8.     The Wild Swans at Coole

9.     Leda and the Swan

 

10.  An Irish Airman Foresees His Death

11.  The Fisherman

12.  The Man and The Echo

 

13.  The Second Coming

14.  Sailing to Byzantium

15.  Among Schoolchildren

 

 

 

Text Box: Rhythm: • - - = spondee • v - = iamb • - v = trochee • - v v = dactyl • v v - = anapest

 

 

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Stolen Child

 

WHERE dips the rocky highland

Of Sleuth Wood in the lake,

There lies a leafy island

Where flapping herons wake

The drowsy water rats;

There we've hid our faery vats,

Full of berrys

And of reddest stolen cherries.

Come away, O human child!

To the waters and the wild

With a faery, hand in hand,

For the world's more full of weeping than you can understand.

 

Where the wave of moonlight glosses

The dim gray sands with light,

Far off by furthest Rosses

We foot it all the night,

Weaving olden dances

Mingling hands and mingling glances

Till the moon has taken flight;

To and fro we leap

And chase the frothy bubbles,

While the world is full of troubles

And anxious in its sleep.

Come away, O human child!

To the waters and the wild

With a faery, hand in hand,

For the world's more full of weeping than you can understand.

 

 

Where the wandering water gushes

From the hills above Glen-Car,

In pools among the rushes

That scarce could bathe a star,

We seek for slumbering trout

And whispering in their ears

Give them unquiet dreams;

Leaning softly out

From ferns that drop their tears

Over the young streams.

Come away, O human child!

To the waters and the wild

With a faery, hand in hand,

For the world's more full of weeping than you can understand.

 

Away with us he's going,

The solemn-eyed:

He'll hear no more the lowing

Of the calves on the warm hillside

Or the kettle on the hob

Sing peace into his breast,

Or see the brown mice bob

Round and round the oatmeal chest.

For he comes, the human child,

To the waters and the wild

With a faery, hand in hand,

For the world's more full of weeping than he can understand.



 

The Stolen Child:

 

Introduction:

·       The Poem opposes Fairyland Island to the real world

·       Poet in poem: perhaps expresses Yeats’ ambiguous attitude to world of imagination and poetry? Escape into Yeats’ childhood in Sligo? The poem also represents his early interest in Irish folklore.

·       The Poem

Comments

chrissy

This was beyond helpful, thanks so much :)

Sian


do you have the full page as its cut off after broken dreams :( this is actually amazing, thankyou! :D

Andre Walters

god bless

Rebekah

pleease pleeeease pleeeeeease give us the rest of this document!!

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