AQA GCSE Physics Unit 1 Chapter 4 Generating Electricity

Revision(:

HideShow resource information
  • Created by: Annie
  • Created on: 22-10-10 10:47

Fuels for Electricity

In  most  power  stations,  water  is  heated  to  produce  steam.  The  steam  drives  a  turbine,  which  is  coupled  to  an  electrical  generator  that  produces  electricity.

The  heat  can  come  from  burning  a  fuel  such  as  coal,  oil  or  gas,  these  are  fossil  fuels;  or  hot  gases  may  drive  the  turbine  directly.

In  a  nuclear  power  station,  the  fuel  that  is  used  is  called  uranium  (or  sometimes  plutonium).  The  nucleus  of  an  unranium  atom  can  under  go  a  process  called  fission  that  releases  energy.  There  are  loads  of  uranium  nuclei,  so  loads  of  fission  reactions  take  place,  producing  loads  of  heat  energy.

More  energy  is  released  from  each  kilogram  of  uranium  under  going  fission  reactions  than  from  each  kilogram  of  fossil  fuels  we  burn.

1 of 10

Energy from Wind and Water

We  can  use  energy  from  wind  and  water  to  drive  turbines  directly. 

  • In  a  wind  turbine  the  wind  passing  over   the  blades  makes  them  rotate  and  drive  the  generator  at  the  top  of  a  narrow  tower.

Electricity  can  be  produced  from  energy  obtained  from  failing  water,  waves  or  tides.

  • At  a  hydroelectric  power  station,  water  which  has  been  collected  in  a  reservoir  is  allowed  to  flow  downhill and  turns  turbines  at  the  bottom  of  the  hill.
  • In  a  pumped  storage  system,  surplus  electricity  is  used  at  times  of  low  demand  to  pump  the  water  back  up  the  hill  to  a  reservoir.
  • This  mean  that  energy  is  stored  and  then  at  time  of  high  demand  the  water  can  be  released  to  fall  through  the  turbines  and  convert  the  stored  energy  to  electrical  energy.
2 of 10

Energy from Wind and Water Continued

  • We  can  use  movement  of  waves  on  the  sea  to  geneate  electricty  with  drivces  that  float  on  water  and  the  movement  drives  the  turbines  and  turns  a  geneator.  Then  the  electricity  is  connected  to  the  National  Grid  by  cables  on  shore.
  • The level  of  sea  around  the  coast  line  rises  and  falls  twice  a  day.  These  changes  in  sea  level  are  called  tides.  If  a  barrage  built  across  a  river  esturay,  the  water  at  each  high  tide  can  be  trapped  behind  it.  When  the  water  is  released  to  fall  down  to  lower  sea  level  it  drives  the  turbine. 
3 of 10

Power from the Sun and Earth

Energy  from  the  Sun  travels  through  space  to  Earth  as  electromagnetic  radiation.  A  solar  cell  can  convert  this  energy  into  electrical  energy.  Each  cell  only  produces  a  small  amount  of  electricity,  so  they  are  useful  to  power  small  devices  such  as  watches  and  calcutalors.  We  can  also  join  together  large  numbers  of  cells  to  form  a  solar  panel.  Water  flowing  through  a  olar  heating  panel  is  heated  directly  by  energy  from  the sun.

Heat  energy  is  produced  inside  the  Earth  by  radioactive  processes  and  this  heats  the  surronding  rock. In  the  few  parts  of  the  world,  hot  water  comes  up  to  the  surface  naturally  and  can  be  used  to  heat  buildings  near  by.

In  other  places,  very  deep  holes  are  drilled  and  cold  water  is  pumped  dowm  to  the  hot  rocks  where  it  is  heated  and  comes  back  to  the  surface  as  steam,  this  steam  is  used  to  drive  turbines  that  turn  generators  and  also  produce  electricity. This  is  called  Geothermal  energy.

4 of 10

Energy and the Enviorment

Coals  advantages:

  • Bigger  reserves  than  other  fossil  fuels.
  • Reliable.

Coals  disadvantages:

  • Non-renewable.
  • Produces  carbon  dioxide,  a  green  house  gas.
  • Produces  sulfur  dioxide,  causing  acid  rain.

Oils  advantages:

  • Reliable.

Oils  disadvantages:

  • Non-renewable.
  • Produces  carbon  dioxide,  a  green  house  gas.
  • Produces  sulfur  dioxide,  causing  acid  rain.
5 of 10

Energy and the Enviorment.

Advantages  of  Gas:

  • Reliable.
  • Gas  power  stations  can  be  started  up  quickly  to  deal  with  high  demand.

Disadvantages  of  Gas:

  • Non-renewable.
  • Produces  carbon  dioxide,  a  green  house  gas.

Advantages  of  Nuclear:

  • No  production  of  polluting  gases.
  • Reliable.

Disadvantages  of  Nulcear:

  • Non  renewable
  • Produces  nuclear  waste,  which  is  difficult  to  dipose  of  safely.
  • Risk  of  a  big  accident,  such  as  Chernobyl.
6 of 10

Energy and the Enviroment

Advantages  of  Wind:

  • Renwable.
  • Free.
  • No  production  of  polluting  gases.

Disadvantages  of  Wind:

  • Requires  large  turbines.
  • Not  pretty  and  noisy.
  • Not  reliable,  the  wind  doesn't  always  blow.

Advantages  of  Falling  Water:

  • Renewable.
  • Free.
  • No  production  of  polluting  gases.
  • Reliable  in  wet  areas.
  • Pumped  storage  system  allows  storage  of  energy.
  • Can  be  started  up  quickly  to  deal  with  sudden  demand.
7 of 10

Energy and the Enviroment

Disadvantages  of  Falling  Water:

  • Only  works  in  wet  and  hilly  areas.
  • Flooding  of  areas  will  affect  the  ecology  of  the  area.

Advantages  of  Waves:

  • Free.
  • Re-newable.
  • No  production  of  polluting  gases.

Disadvantages  of  Waves:

  • Can  be  hazards  to  boats.
  • Not  reliable.
8 of 10

Energy and the Enviroment

Advantages  of  Tides:

  • Free.
  • Re-newable.
  • No  production  of  polluting  gases.
  • Reliable,  always  tides  twice  a  day.

Disadvantages  of  Tides:

  • Only  a  few  river  estuaries  are  sutiable.
  • Building  a  barriage  affects  the  local  ecology.

Advantages  of  Solar:

  • Free.
  • Re-newable.
  • No  production  of  polluting  gases.
  • Reliable in  hot  countries,  in  the  daytime.
9 of 10

Energy and the Enviroment

Disadvantages  of  Solar:

  • Only  sitiable  for  small  amounts  of  energy,  or  requires  large  cell  numbers.
  • Unreliable  in  less  sunny  countries.

Advantages  of  Geothermal:

  • Renewable.
  • Free.
  • No  production  of  polluting  gases.

Disadvantages  of  Geothermal:

  • Only  economically  viable  in  very  few  places.
  • Drilling  through  the  large  depth  of  a  rock  is  difficult  and  expensive.
10 of 10

Comments

SwaghettiYolonaise

Thanks i needed this 4 my exams on 2nd March 

lesley

Thanks alot Annie, much appreciated

Similar Physics resources:

See all Physics resources »See all Electricity resources »