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Page 1

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The electronvolt

Page 2

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Another Unit for
Energy
In Electricity, we can use the
kilowatt hour (kWh) instead of the
Joule (J) as a convenient unit for
large energy values.
Likewise, at the atomic scale we
need a more convenient energy unit
for very small energy values ­ the
electronvolt.

Page 3

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The electronvolt
This is a non-SI unit of energy
equal to the Kinetic Energy gained
by a single electron when it moves
through a potential difference.

Page 4

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The electronvolt
1 electronvolt is defined as the
charge on an electron multiplied by
a potential difference of 1 volt.
Unit: eV (1eV = 1.6x10-19 J )

Page 5

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Conversion factor
Just as: 1 kWh = 3.6 MJ
So:
1 eV = 1.6 x 10-19 J

Page 6

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Converting
IMPORTANT: You cannot use eV
values in any equation. You must
practice converting energy values
between Joules and electronvolts.
Remember this acronym: D eV J M
(Pronounced "Devjem")

Page 7

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D eV J M
D (eVJM) i.e. to convert
electronvolts to Joules you
MULTIPLY the eV value by
1.6x10-19.
(DeVJ) M i.e. to convert Joules
to electronvolts you DIVIDE the
Joule value by 1.6x10-19.

Page 8

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Using eV
As a unit, electronvolts can be used
to express any energy value for any
object or system ­ it's not limited to
just electrons. (in practice it's only
used for energies on the atomic
scale)

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Pages in this set

Page 1

Preview of page 1
The electronvolt

Page 2

Preview of page 2
Another Unit for
Energy
In Electricity, we can use the
kilowatt hour (kWh) instead of the
Joule (J) as a convenient unit for
large energy values.
Likewise, at the atomic scale we
need a more convenient energy unit
for very small energy values ­ the
electronvolt.

Page 3

Preview of page 3
The electronvolt
This is a non-SI unit of energy
equal to the Kinetic Energy gained
by a single electron when it moves
through a potential difference.

Page 4

Preview of page 4
The electronvolt
1 electronvolt is defined as the
charge on an electron multiplied by
a potential difference of 1 volt.
Unit: eV (1eV = 1.6x10-19 J )

Page 5

Preview of page 5
Conversion factor
Just as: 1 kWh = 3.6 MJ
So:
1 eV = 1.6 x 10-19 J

Page 6

Preview of page 6
Converting
IMPORTANT: You cannot use eV
values in any equation. You must
practice converting energy values
between Joules and electronvolts.
Remember this acronym: D eV J M
(Pronounced "Devjem")

Page 7

Preview of page 7
D eV J M
D (eVJM) i.e. to convert
electronvolts to Joules you
MULTIPLY the eV value by
1.6x10-19.
(DeVJ) M i.e. to convert Joules
to electronvolts you DIVIDE the
Joule value by 1.6x10-19.

Page 8

Preview of page 8
Using eV
As a unit, electronvolts can be used
to express any energy value for any
object or system ­ it's not limited to
just electrons. (in practice it's only
used for energies on the atomic
scale)

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No comments have yet been made