In “An Inspector Calls” how does J.B. Priestley use dramatic devices to convey his concerns and ideas to the members of the audience, as well as interest and involve them in the play?

In “An Inspector Calls” how does J.B. Priestley use dramatic devices to convey his concerns and ideas to the members of the audience, as well as interest and involve them in the play? 


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Preview of In “An Inspector Calls” how does J.B. Priestley use dramatic devices to convey his concerns and ideas to the members of the audience, as well as interest and involve them in the play?

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In "An Inspector Calls" how does J.B. Priestley use dramatic devices
to convey his concerns and ideas to the members of the audience,
as well as interest and involve them in the play?
An inspector calls is a mystery, suspense thriller.
"No, I've never wanted to play." Priestley shows the inspector as serious and makes the superior,
high-classed Mr Birling feel low as Mr Birling was asking about gold and he just denied him. During
the Edwardian Era the high and low classed families were segregated which made the rich families
have pride but when the inspector, with no signs of remorse, he claims he is different from the
other police officers in the community.
Priestley's main concerns when he wrote the play was because the rich were extremely arrogant
compared to the poor. "(Reproachfully) Arthur, you're not supposed to say such things-" Mrs Birling
does not let Arthur Birling portray his gratitude to their maid Edna. `Reproachfully' suggests that
Sybil Birling has mentions this on numerous occasions to Mr Birling. This also shows the character
of Mrs Birling as a cold-hearted, boastful and snobbish person who is not grateful. Mr Birling was
complimenting Edna while he was rudely interrupted by his wife because he mentioned that the
food as "Absolutely First-Class" and was stopped because in this era it was unnatural to favour an
inferior being. She is telling her husband what to do and in those days the wife should not talk to
her husband like that. The women of the Edwardian Era were less respected and they had less
rights compared to men. Due to this, the suffragettes were formed. They were a group of women
who stood up for other women so they could earn equal rights as the men when it came down to
matters related to voting. Suffragettes originate from the word suffrage which means not having
the right to vote.
Life in the Edwardian Era was a complete contrast between the rich and the poor. The poor had to
work for life-threatening hours with minimum wage which was not even enough for a living. They
can not even afford to feed their families; the rich had `port' and take it all for granted. The rich
women did not have jobs whereas the poor women had to beg on streets and were seen as gutters.
The rich thought that they were being helpful as they gave him jobs. Lastly, the rich had a high
education- attended schools and colleges. However the poor men did not have an education as they
worked to keep their families alive.
This was also the era where the world was developing and great technology was becoming available
to the individuals who had the money to pay for them. Builders and engineers were inspired to build
the greatest of creations man has seen but this was mainly due to selfishness to get their names
heard worldwide. Priestley uses the Titanic as an example that if someone is rich or something is
expensive it does not suggest that it is perfect. To prove this Mr Birling says the Titanic is
"unsinkable" whereas we knew until one night where it hit the iceberg and drowned. This was one
of the dramatic devices Priestley uses in the play which is dramatic irony. Mr Birling also relates
this to his family as they are rich (he thinks they're perfect until one night the inspector came and
showed them their place in the society as nothing but attempted criminals who killed an innocent
girl.
Also, Mr Birling's selfishness is also shown as although he is happy with the marriage of his
daughter Sheila Birling with Gerald croft, his main objective was so he can benefit himself. "We
may look forward to the time when Crofts and Birlings are no longer competing but are working
together." He says this during a family feast where the audience can interpret Mr Birling's true
colours.
Inspector Goole has a very important role in the play. He wants to teach the Birlings that it is not
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J.B. Priestley's main concerns were to show the Birlings and also the audience of the play that even
the smallest of actions can have enormous effects. He proves this by showing that after Eva Smith
got sacked by Mr Birling she had a job at Milwards where she was settled. Sheila Birling was
shopping there and "caught Eva Smith smiling at the assistant.…read more

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The doorbell interrupted their important dinner so it had to be somebody
important, and we further come to notice it is someone unexpected when the narrator says, "We
hear the sharp ring of a front door bell. Birling stops to listen." The narrator has emphasised the
fact the Mr Birling, does not know who's at the door and is slightly surprised. "Sharp" suggests the
doorbell should be noticed, and it was loud, portraying that a hurricane was about to hit them.…read more

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Priestley emphasises the difference between the upper and lower classes very strongly throughout
the play. He uses the Birling family as a representative of the Upper Class and Eva Smith as a
representative of the Lower Class. Priestley shows how in 1912, Upper Class citizens, such as the
Birlings had no respect for Lower Class citizens. He uses this class divide to convey his message
and to show that the rigidity of the class system is incompatible with his views on community and
responsibility.…read more

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