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AQA LAW
LAW 02
CONSOLIDATED REVISION

CRIMINAL LIABILITY

EXAMINATION STYLE QUESTIONS FOR SECTION A 00 02

ESSENTIAL DEFINITIONS 03 09
actus reus mens rea chain of causation
coincidence of actus reus and mens rea contemporaneity rule
how the law deals with omissions strict liability offences
the doctrine of transferred malice…

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LAW 02 SECTION A INTRODUCTION TO CRIMINAL LIABILITY
EXAMINATION STYLE QUESTIONS FOR SECTION A
Tuesday 2 June 2009 1.30pm to 3.00pm


1. George shared a flat with Nina. Whilst Nina was out, Khalid came round to play a video
game with George. Nina intensely disliked Khalid. George was losing and…

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ESSENTIAL DEFINITIONS

Actus reus

A criminal offence usually requires both a guilty act (actus reus) and a guilty
mind (mens rea). The actus reus of a crime is the voluntary, deliberate act of
the defendant. If the defendant's act is not voluntary, there can be no
crime. This can be…

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Mens rea

Mens rea is the Latin phrase for the `guilty mind'. In most but not all crimes
(strict liability offences), it is necessary to prove the state of mind of the
defendant was `guilty' at the time he committed the actus reus.

The main levels of mens rea are…

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Chain of Causation

In order to prove the defendant committed a crime, we must show that it
was the act of the defendant that caused the injury to the victim and not
some other cause. In other words, there must be a direct link from the
defendant's conduct to the…

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was being dropped that caused his death. The Court disagreed and said that
the stabbing was the substantial, operating cause of the victim's death. The
chain of causation was unbroken. The conviction for murder was upheld.





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Coincidence of Actus Reus and Mens Rea - contemporaneity rule

In order for a criminal offence to take place, both the actus reus and the
mens rea must be present at the same time (unless it is a strict liability
offence). In most cases, the defendant forms the guilty intention,…

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HOW THE LAW DEALS WITH OMISSIONS

In Law, the normal rule is that an omission (failure to do something)
cannot make a person guilty of an offence. For example, if A is drowning
and B does not hold out his hand to save him, B has committed no
offence.

However,…

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