Tudor Rebellions

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  • Tudor rebellions
    • Lovell Rebellion
      • Lord Lovell and the Stafford brothers (Humphrey and Thomas) were loyal supporters of Richard. They tried to raise a rebellion in the Midlands and north in spring 1486 but failed as Henry had spies who told him.
      • Lovell fled to Flanders and the Staffords sought sanctuary.
        • Humphrey was executed but Thomas was pardoned.
      • Henry's progress to the north helped to win him loyalty.
    • Simnel Rebellion
      • Lambert Simnel claimed to be the Earl of Warwick, one of Richard III's nephews.
      • Simnel's rising was a major threat to Henry.
        • It came within a year of Henry taking the throne and forced him into battle, which could have had a similar result to Bosworth.
        • The rising began in autumn 1486 but Henry wasn't aware of it until 1487.
      • Simnel was crowned Edward VI in Ireland in May 1487 and received support from Margaret of Burgundy and the Earl of Lincoln. When rebels landed in Lancashire they couldn't attract support. This wasn't helped by the presence of Irish, who were seen as brutal, among the force.
      • Henry paraded the real Earl of Warwick and raised an army which confronted Simnel at Stoke near Newark. Although some of his men held back, Henry won.
    • Warbeck Rebellion
      • Henry paraded the real Earl of Warwick and raised an army which confronted Simnel at Stoke near Newark. Although some of his men held back, Henry won.
        • Henry therefore couldn't parade the real prince.
      • The origins of the conspiracy are unclear but he gained support from the French court, the HRE and Scotland.
      • Warbeck's failed 2nd invasion of England in the west to coincide with the Cornish rising and he surrendered in 1497.
      • Warbeck stayed at court but further plotting resulted in his execution in 1499.
      • Warbeck's rebellion wasn't a direct threat but it lasted a long time and had widespread support from France and Burgundy.
    • Yorkshire Rebellion
      • Henry needed money to aid Brittany against France. Northern counties objected as they were usually exempt from tax due to the cost of defending the northern border from Scotland.
      • Henry didn't initially negotiate and the tax collector, the Earl of Northumberland, was murdered.
      • The rising was easily crushed but no tax was collected as Henry recognised the need to compromise.
    • Cornish Rebellion
      • Henry wanted the west to pay towards the invasion from the north by Warbeck, causing the uprising.
      • Rebels gathered at Bodmin and marched to London before they were crushed at Bodmin by a royal army of 25,000. The rising attracted 15,000 men.
      • It wasn't a threat to Henry but the leaders were executed and others were fined.

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