Streetcar Scene 1

View mindmap
  • Scene 1
    • Relationships
      • Stanley and Blanche
        • Stanley and Blanche immediately constrast, Stanley is strong masculine and brutal. Blanche flutters around the flat
          • Blanche feels threatens by Stanley as he is so blunt and can see past her many facades
        • there is an immediate power switch as soon as Stanley enters. Blanche's syntax are now short and Stanley expand on his answers.
        • the juxtaposition between Blanche and Stanley is accentuates by the use of language Stanley says 'shack up' and more colloquial terms.
      • Stella and Stanley
        • Stanley hurling the meat as Stella and her accepting happily reflects their sexual relationship
        • We see Stella take a dependent role in her relationship with Stanley. This juxtaposes her relationship with Blanche
          • 'I can hardly stand when he is away for a night'
      • Stella and Blanche
        • their first meeting Blanche is hysterical giving Stella a 'spasmodic embrace' and crying out her name 'Stella'
          • this reflects their roles in their relationship. Stella is the calm one that sooths Blanche whereas Blanche is erratic and hysterical.
        • Blanche makes Stella inferior to her using words such as 'baby' and 'lamb' making her appear young and innocent compared to Blanche
          • this can be seen as ironic as Stella is almost the mother in their situation waiting on Blanche getting her cokes and whiskey.
        • Blanche treats Stella like a child saying 'Stand up! You messy child'. This gives Blanche a purpose making her feel better about herself and Stella allows it as she is concerned for her sister
          • it also represents how Blanche longs for her old life as is almost re-enacting it with Stella
        • Blanche belittles others to make herself feel better. We see this when she remarks on Stella's weight saying 'plump as a little partridge' and then juxtaposing this saying 'I weigh the same I did the summer you left Belle Reve'
        • Stella can be seen as the calm submissive sister through the syntax. Blanche has long paragraphs where as Stella has short sentences. Blanche also asks Stella's questions and answer's them herself.
        • Blanche acts as though Stella is inferior to he but really she needs Stella to support her: 'she laughs nervously and glances at Stella for reassurance'
    • Themes
      • masculinity
        • Stanley represents the epitome of a 'man'
          • he is first depicted in 'blue denim work clothes' and carrying his 'bowling jacket'
            • this suggests he is both the breadwinner and an active strong man
            • he is holding a 'red-stained package' which is supposed show his primitive side bringing home the kill.
            • the crude nature in which these men act can also be seen as they enter in the latter part of the scene and they tell a joke and reply with 'coarse laughter'
      • sexuality
        • Stanley presented as holding the 'red-stained package' also represents his sexual allure to women.
        • we see the strong sexual bond between Stella and Stanley. 'when he's away for a week I nearly go wild' representing her passion for him.
          • Blanche tries to take the 'Southern Belle' role with the reaction 'gracious' however we know Blanche is also full of desire showing this façade she has.
        • we see Stanley has huge amounts of sexual appeal as he has the 'power and pride of a richly feathered male bird among hens'
          • this idea makes him seem more primitive and shows that he cars about 'sex' and 'food'. He is also compared to an animal strengthening the idea
      • feminity
        • Stanley greets Stella using the term 'baby' suggesting he views her as subordinate to him and dependent on him.
      • fantasy and dellusion
        • Stella lives a Elysian fields which was the resting place of the Greek Afterlife
          • This suggests it is a 'heaven' juxtaposing how Blanche views it. However, it is here that Blanche may find a place as it is where mismatched people end up.
        • Miller romanticises New Orleans - 'invests the scene with a kind of lyricism and gracefully attenuates the atmosphere of decay.'
          • This idea mirrors the dellusions of herself Blanche holds throughout the play suggesting New Orleans is her perfect resting place.
        • Blanche delusions herself with her drinking problem, making comment like 'one is my limit' or making a joke out it in 'Where could it be...I spy, I spy!'
          • this resembles Blanche's delusion in not being able to let go of the past and how she can't accept her true nature.
        • Blanche's comment about Stella's weight reflect Stella's ability to move on, gain weight and Blanche wanting to stay in her past dream world.
      • interior and exterior appearance
        • Blanche is presented as 'her uncertain manner and white clothes suggests a moth'
          • reflects how she may appear to be pure and innocent but is lost and searching for some form of 'light'
        • Blanche is depicted as 'her legs pressed close together and her hands clasped tightly'
          • this shows she tries to appear prim and proper and closed of to sexuality, 'legs pressed close together', but in fact, much like Stella, desire rules her life.
        • 'not until I've bathed...and turn that over-light off'
          • this represents how Blanche is constantly trying not to be exposed for who she is and tries to rid herself of her past through bathing to make herself pure
    • Characters
      • Stella
        • Stella begins to cry at the end of the speech showing she too is vulnerable and feels victimised by Blanche.
        • Stella is depicted as more progressive than Blanche in terms of her sexuality. She is more open saying she goes 'wild' with out Stanley
        • Stella is quite submissive and controlled suggesting when she is with Stanley she can revert to a more primitive state
      • Stanley
        • Stanley's type of masculinity juxtaposes Mitch
          • 'two men come round the corner Stanley Kowalski and Mitch'
            • the fact that Stanley is introduced with his whole name and Mitch singular shows Stanley is more masculine
        • Stanley is depicted in a very animalistic way
          • He uses terms like 'territory' and Stella says he is a 'different species'
        • Stanley is depicted as 'gaudy seed-bearer'
          • He exudes 'animal joy' and presented as primitive to showcase his power and masculinity
            • 'he sizes women up a glance'
              • this phrase sounds like they are talking about meat and suggesting Stanley dehumanises women and views them as meat.
        • Stanley loves 'a good drink, his car, his radio, anything that is his'
          • this reflects Stanley's dominant personality and ownership over women.

Comments

No comments have yet been made

Similar English Literature resources:

See all English Literature resources »See all A Streetcare Named Desire resources »