Physical Early Adulthood

  • Created by: maizie
  • Created on: 29-03-18 11:27
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  • Physical Early Adulthood
    • young adults are usually at the peak of their physical performance between the ages of 19 and 28.
      • by this age, young adults have reached their full height and strength, and reaction time and manual dexterity are also at their peak
        • Exercise and a healthy diet can help to develop physical fitness and athletic skills into middle adulthood.
          • After this age, adults may gradually lose some strength and speed, although these changes are often unnoticed outside of competitive sport.
            • decline in physical capabilities may be exacerbated towards the end of this life stage if individual have an unhealthy diet, do not do regular exercise and maintain an unhealthy lifestyle.
              • during  this life stage, women are at their most fertile.
                • Pregnancy and lactation are key phases in an adult females lifespan.
                  • During early pregnancy, women experience may physical and emotional changes in preparation for parenthood.
                    • Pregnancy hormones can cause mood swings.
    • Pregnancy.
      • Hormonal changes take place, with an increase in progesterone which maintains the pregnancy, while the increase in oestrogen may be responsible for the sickness some women suffer in early pregnancy.
        • hormones also affect the shape and appearance of their breasts, including darkened veins due to increased blood supply.
          • ******* and areolas darken and breasts become more sensitive and tender, preparing the breasts to produce mil (lactation) to feed the baby.
            • Lactation: the process in which your breasts produce milk to feed your baby.
              • this begins while you're still pregnant and is triggered by the hormonal fluctuations in your body during pregnancy.
                • your milk production system begins to work while you're still pregnant and produces colostrum, the  pre-milk that is full of antibodies, nutrients and easily digestible fluid.
                  • colostrum is what your baby drinks during the first few days after birth before you milk supply fully comes in.
      • milk.
        • colostrum: important for new babies
          • Foremilk: rich in water and nutrients to keep your baby healthy and hydrated.
            • hind milk: rich in fat and calories which your baby needs to grow strong and healthy.
              • it's important that your baby gets both of these.
                • Foremilk: rich in water and nutrients to keep your baby healthy and hydrated.
                  • hind milk: rich in fat and calories which your baby needs to grow strong and healthy.
                    • it's important that your baby gets both of these.
      • Peri-menopause
        • By the time a woman is in her forties, her ovaries gradually begin to make less oestrogen.
          • this means that the ovaries stop producing an egg each month.
            • this stage is generally referred to as the peri-menopause transition, this lasts until menopause.
              • on average, this last four years, however it can vary between a few months or as long as 10 years.
                • this stage ends when a woman has not had a period for 12 months.
                  • The reduction in oestrogen causes physical and emotional symptoms.
                    • Often your doctor can make the diagnosis of peri- menopause based on your symptoms.
                      • a blood test to check your hormone levels may also help, but your hormone levels are changing during peri-menopause.
                        • it may be more helpful to have several blood tests done at different times for comparison.
                          • despite a decline in fertility during the peri-menopause stage, you can still become pregnant.
                            • if you do not want to become pregnant, you should use some form of birth control until you reach menopause (if you have gone 12 months without a period).
                              • for some women, getting pregnant can be difficult once they're in their late 30s to early 40s due to a drop in fertility.
      • Physical and emotional effects of peri-menopause
        • physical
          • hot flushes
          • breast tenderness
          • Loss of libido (loss of sex drive)
          • fatigue
          • Irregular or heavy periods.
          • Vaginal dryness
            • discomfort during sex
          • trouble sleeping
          • urine leakage when coughing or sneezing
          • urinary urgency (an urgent need to urinate more)
          • weight gain
        • emotional
          • mood swings
          • depression
          • low self-esteem
          • anger
          • anxiety
          • irritability
          • dizziness
          • difficulty concentrating

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