Juliet

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  • Juliet
    • My only love sprung from my only hate! Too early seen unknown, and known too late! —As all the guests are leaving the party, Juliet discovers that Romeo is a Montague, and laments that she has fallen in love with him.
    • O Romeo, Romeo! wherefore art thou Romeo? —Juliet, at her window, laments that her love is Romeo, son of Montague, the enemy of her father Capulet. (She doesn't know that Romeo is listening to her.)
    • What ’s in a name? That which we call a rose By any other name would smell as sweet. —Juliet, speaking to the night, reflects that the only thing wrong with the one she loves is just his name.
    • . . . stony limits cannot hold love out,And what love can do, that dares love attempt. —When Juliet asks how he managed to get over the high wall to Capulet's garden, Romeo replies that he flew on the wings of love, which is stronger than "stony limits."
    • Alack, there lies more peril in thine eye Than twenty of their swords! —When Juliet warns Romeo that her kinsmen will kill him if they find him in the Capulet's garden, Romeo replies that her beauty is more likely to kill him than is a Capulet sword.
    • . . . At lovers’ perjuries, They say, Jove laughs. —Worried (for a moment) that Romeo may be a false lover, Juliet quotes a saying that shows the world doesn't take false love too seriously.
    • Romeo. Lady, by yonder blessed moon I swear, That tips with silver all these fruit-tree tops—    Juliet. O swear not by the moon, the inconstant moon, That monthly changes in her circled orb, Lest that thy love prove likewise variable. —Romeo tries to swear that he is a faithful lover, but Juliet interrupts him.
    • . . . Although I joy in thee, I have no joy of this contract tonight: It is too rash, too unadvised, too sudden; Too like the lightning, which doth cease to be Ere one can say "It lightens." Sweet, good night! This bud of love, by summer's ripening breath, May prove a beauteous flower when next we meet.” —Juliet says to Romeo that their love is too sudden and too brilliant to believed, and bids him good night with the hope that their love will bloom.
    • My bounty is as boundless as the sea, My love as deep; the more I give to thee, The more I have, for both are infinite. —Again pledging her love to Romeo, Juliet says that the more she gives love to him, the more she has.
    • How silver-sweet sound lovers’ tongues by night, Like softest music to attending ears! —In the balcony scene, after Juliet is called in, then comes back out and calls to Romeo, he is enthralled by the sound of her voice.
    • Good night, good night! parting is such sweet sorrow, That I shall say good night till it be morrow. —In the balcony scene, just before she goes in for the last time, Juliet says good night.
    • when he shall die, Take him and cut him out in little stars, And he will make the face of heaven so fine That all the world will be in love with night, And pay no worship to the garish sun. —On her wedding night, waiting for Romeo to come to her, Juliet says that Romeo, her new husband, will be her glorious lover forever.
    • But old folks — many feign as they were dead; Unwieldy, slow, heavy and pale as lead. —Waiting for the Nurse to bring her news from Romeo, Juliet says that old folks are too slow to appreciate the urgency of youth and love.
    • when he shall die, Take him and cut him out in little stars, And he will make the face of heaven so fine That all the world will be in love with night, And pay no worship to the garish sun. —On her wedding night, waiting for Romeo to come to her, Juliet says that Romeo, her new husband, will be her glorious lover forever.
    • It was the nightingale, and not the lark,That pierced the fearful hollow of thine ear —At the end of their wedding night, Juliet tries to persuade Romeo that it is not yet morning, and therefore not yet time for him to leave.
    • It is the lark that sings so out of tune, Straining harsh discords and unpleasing sharps. —Afraid that Romeo will be in danger from staying with her too long, Juliet says that it is the lark (harbinger of the day) that is singing.
    • Villain and he be many miles asunder. —When her mother describes Romeo as a villain, Juliet says to herself that he is the opposite of a villain.
    • and all these woes shall serve For sweet discourses in our time to come. —As Romeo leaves her room, Juliet asks if they will ever see one another again; Romeo says they certainly will, and talk about their current troubles as fond reminder of their love.
    • Thank me no thankings, nor, proud me no prouds. —When her father announces that he has arranged to wed her to Paris, Juliet tries to talk her way out of it by thanking him for his care of her, but saying that she cannot be proud of something she hates; her father refuses to listen and mocks what he considers to be Juliet's twisting of words.
    • Not stepping o’er the bounds of modesty. —After telling her father that she will be obedient to him in all things, Juliet tells him that she met Paris and "gave him what becomed love I might, / Not stepping o’er the bounds of modesty." Juliet is only technically telling the truth.
    • I have a faint cold fear thrills through my veins, That almost freezes up the heat of life. —Preparing to take the sleeping potion, Juliet is almost overcome by fear.
    • Romeo, Romeo, Romeo! Here's drink—I drink to thee. —In her last words before she drinks the sleeping potion, Juliet reminds herself of why she is doing it.

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