GCSE Music ASO3

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  • Created on: 25-07-16 12:43
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  • GCSE Music ASO3
    • Miles Davis - All Blues
      • Relesed in 1959
      • Structure
        • Based on 12 bar blues
      • Instumentation
        • there is use of: Trumpet , Alto saxaphone , tenor saxaphone , piano , drums and bass
        • There is use of frontline instruamnts and the rhythm sections
      • Melody
        • Characterised by rising 6ths
          • Four imrpovised solos: trumpet solo , alto sax solo , tenor sax solo , piano solo
      • Harmony and tonality
        • 12 bar blues - this is repeated
        • In G major but with a flattened  seventh (a blue note)
        • Uses the Mixolydian mode  as this is a piece  of modal jazz
      • Rhythm meter and tempo
        • Metre is in 6/4
          • But its called a jazz waltz because each 6/4 bar sounds like a pair of bars in 3/4 time
        • Performed with swing quavers
          • This means that each pair of quavers played with the first a little longer than the second
      • Instrumental techniques
        • at the start the snare drum is played with wire brushes
        • the bass plays pizz throughout
        • The trumpet is muted
        • The piano part begins with a tremolo
    • Moby - Why does my heart feel so bad
      • Comes from the album play in 1999
      • Structure and texture
        • The song is based on a verse - chorus structure
          • The samples are looped
        • After the second verse there is a breakdown
        • Song is split up in 8 bar sections
      • Rhythm , tempo and metre
        • The song is in 4/4 with a steady tempo of 98
        • Syncopation is used the piano , vocal and strings
        • Rhythms are varied between sections to provide contrast
      • Use of technology
        • synthesizers  for the strings bass and piano sounds
        • a sampler for vocals and drum backbeat
        • A drum machine
        • sequencer to trigger the sampler and synthesisers
        • In addition  to effects that have been applied to the music
          • Panning used in piano movement
          • Electronic ghosting
          • Reverb and delay
          • EQ
      • Harmony and Tonality
        • The harmony is made  from repeating simple chord progressions
          • The first sample is Am Em G D
            • Amazing Emily goes dancing
    • Jeff Buckley - Grace
      • 1994 - Folk Fusion
      • Uses of technology
        • Modulation ( on the synthesizer at the beginning)
        • Distortion and flanging on the gitaurs
        • Overdubbing in guitar parts. The extra vocal parts on the bridge are also produced by overdubbing
        • EQ in the final verse remove low frequencies of Buckleys voice
      • Instrumentation and texture
        • Uses: guitars, bass guitars , synthesiser , strings and drum kit
          • The Drums and guitars accompany throughout most of the song however the  synthesiser  and strings are less prominemt
        • The texture thickens towards the end of the song ( in the coda)
      • Tonality and Harmony
        • The piece is in E minor however the first half focuses on the  chord of D
        • The Harmony is unusual , many of the chords are chromatic and move in a parallel motion - some of the harmonies are dissonant
      • Melody and Word setting
        • most of the vocal phrases are falling using frequent ornamentation and glissandos over different notes
          • Most of the word setting is syllabic but there are some melismas ("fire" , "love")
            • In the bridge there is a passages of vocalisation where Buckley used falsetto
        • There is use of word painting
      • Rhythm , Metre and tempo
        • The meter is 12/8 - four dotted crotchets per bar
        • There is frequent syncopation in the vocal line and in the bass line
        • Cross rhythms are created through the use of quavers against dotted quavers

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