5.1 - Hazards in Geographical Context.

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  • 5.1 PERCEPTION AND RESPONSES
    • Human Responses to hazard events
      • Park Model - showing how people RESPOND to hazards only.
    • Disaster risk equation - measures the hazard vulnerability of a place.
      • Equation is: RISK = (HAZARD X VULNERABILITY) / CAPACITY TO COPE.
        • This equation requires on to be subjective about the hazard vulnerability of a place due to 'capacity to cope/mitigation' and 'vulnerability'.
          • Good in a way because one can asses which countries must focus on reducing their hazard vulnerability through use of this equation by improving their prediction, prevention and protection.
        • Good in a way because one can asses which countries must focus on reducing their hazard vulnerability through use of this equation by improving their prediction, prevention and protection.
      • This equation requires on to be subjective about the hazard vulnerability of a place due to 'capacity to cope/mitigation' and 'vulnerability'.
      • Looking at ongoing process before and after hazard event
        • DISASTER RISK/HAZARD MANAGEMENT CYCLE - 4 stages, not in order.
          • Preparedness - the higher this level, the lower the vulnerability of a population in relation to hazard events and DISASTERS.
          • Mitigation - reducing the impacts of an event through earthquake-resistant buildings e.g. motion-absorbing ones and practising fire drills in Japan.
          • Response - how people react when a disaster occurs, like search and rescue; all IMMEDIATE responses.
          • Recovery - restoring the affected area to something approaching normality. E.g. in the short-term restoration of services for long-term planning to take place.
      • Risk
        • The likelihood that humans will be seriously impacts by a hazard.
          • Perceived risk - the subjective judgement one makes about the characteristics and severity of a hazard.
            • Past experience of a hazard for people living in perhaps hazard-prone areas that have affected people's perceived risks of future hazards.
            • Wealthier/affluent people may be more able to afford moving from hazard-prone to less hazard-prone areas or to build their homes to withstand hazards, so their perceived risk of hazards is SMALLER.

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