WW1 - Discipline and Morale of Soldiers + Medical Advances

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How many death sentences were given for those deserting or inflicting injuries on themselves?
3,080 death sentences - 9/10 sentenced to hard labour
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How many cases of desertion were there?
38,000 out of 5.7 million
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Who was in charge of post to the army?
Royal Engineers Postal Section
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In 1916 how many letters and parcels were handled?
11 million letters and 875,000 parcels
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By 1917 how many mailbags were crossing the Channel every day?
19 mailbags, or 125,000 letters
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In Summer 1917, how many soldiers hadn't been home for 18 months?
100,000, and 400,000 hadn't been home for a year
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In 1918 how many days leave did you get a year?
70 days per year, and you could go on leave every 6 months
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How well fed were the soldiers?
Well fed, monotonous but regular food, rum provided, tobacco was free
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How much were soldiers paid?
7 shillings per week, with food and clothing free, more than the French or Germans got but less than the Americans or Canadians
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What was the rotation system?
Rotation of where the soldiers were posted, only 10 days a month in the trenches, and of that, only 2-4 days on the front line
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Where were the soldiers when they weren't on the front line?
In rear billets where entertainment such as concerts, parties, football, films, brothels and athlectics kept morale high
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How many British soldiers were executed and why?
346 executed, 266 for desertion, 37 for murder
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What were common field punishments?
Being tied up to a stationary object for two hours - humiliation, hard labour, demotion, being confined to barracks, 'Jankers' - loss of pay and doing lots of nasty jobs
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Why were lice a problem and how did the army try and solve it?
Caused irritation and trench fever (flu like symptoms), delousing stations as well as hot showers and changes of clothes established to little effect
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What were the causes and treatment of trench foot?
Standing in cold mud and water and too tightly laced boots - causes swelling and could cause gangrene leading to amputation. whale oil and spare pairs of socks introduced
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What decreased the death rate of typhoid?
Innoculations - deaths decreased to 2% of that in the Boer war
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What percentage did infections caused by tetanus drop to?
0% from 32% before the war
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What percentage did developing gangrene drop to?
1% from 12% due to the use of mild antiseptics and the irrigation of wounds
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What was this the first war for?
More deaths from battle than disease
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How many people were in the Royal Medical Corps?
1,509 officers and 16,331 other ranks in 1914
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How many doctors had volunteered by July 1915?
25%
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What was the increase in X ray machines?
From 1 in 1914 to 6
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What did the Mental Health Bill of 1915 affect?
Shell shock, allowing people suffering it to be treated for 6 months in specialised medical institutions
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How affective were blood transfusions?
Still in its infancy, blood discovered by trial and error, haemorrhages usually fatal, saline drips used to increase blood volume
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What did Thomas Splint's treatment for fractures do?
Decrese death rates by fractures down to 30%
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What did Harvey Cushing advance?
Treatements for head wounds and brain surgery
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What did Harold Gillies advance?
Plastic surgery, especially facial, developing new skin grafting techniques and taking 2000 patients after the Somme
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Other cards in this set

Card 2

Front

How many cases of desertion were there?

Back

38,000 out of 5.7 million

Card 3

Front

Who was in charge of post to the army?

Back

Preview of the front of card 3

Card 4

Front

In 1916 how many letters and parcels were handled?

Back

Preview of the front of card 4

Card 5

Front

By 1917 how many mailbags were crossing the Channel every day?

Back

Preview of the front of card 5
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