Wuthering Heights

A few flashcards with quotes, who speaks them and what they mean.

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Cathy 1: "Whatever souls are made of, his and mine are the same."
Cathy is talking about love beyond the physical - it is eternal, pure, and far from ordinary. It is also a far cry from the way she feels about Linton.
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Cathy 1: "Linton's is as different as a moonbeam from lighting, or frost from fire."
The use of natural imagery is a running theme throughout the novel, and indicates that the characters are closer to the natural world than the human world. It implies homeliness and lack of formal education.
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Heathcliff: "May you not rest as long as I am living! You say I killed you - haunt me, then!"
He gets his wish at the start of the novel, when Cathy's ghost appears to him. It also shows Heathcliff's refusal to comply with natural or social law, as he is openly grieving for her and actively wishing her to come from beyond the grave.
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Heathcliff: "I cannot live without my life! I cannot live without my soul!"
Heathcliff is grieving openly and painfully for Cathy. His reference to souls links to the previous quotation from Cathy, implying that they will always be spiritually bound together.
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Heathcliff: "What fiend possesses you to stare back at me, continually, with those infernal eyes? Down with them!"
Heathcliff is talking to second-generation Cathy, who has her mother's eyes. Eyes are important symbolism in the novel, and 2nd Cathy's eyes provide a link to 1st Cathy that Heathcliff would rather not be reminded of.
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Lockwood: "wondered how any one could ever imagine unquiet slumbers for the sleepers in that quiet earth."
This shows Lockwood's unreliability as a narrator and his total failure to understand the story. Heathcliff and Cathy's bond was so strong that not even death can part them, and the fact that he fails to see this shows a real lack of understanding.
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Other cards in this set

Card 2

Front

The use of natural imagery is a running theme throughout the novel, and indicates that the characters are closer to the natural world than the human world. It implies homeliness and lack of formal education.

Back

Cathy 1: "Linton's is as different as a moonbeam from lighting, or frost from fire."

Card 3

Front

He gets his wish at the start of the novel, when Cathy's ghost appears to him. It also shows Heathcliff's refusal to comply with natural or social law, as he is openly grieving for her and actively wishing her to come from beyond the grave.

Back

Preview of the back of card 3

Card 4

Front

Heathcliff is grieving openly and painfully for Cathy. His reference to souls links to the previous quotation from Cathy, implying that they will always be spiritually bound together.

Back

Preview of the back of card 4

Card 5

Front

Heathcliff is talking to second-generation Cathy, who has her mother's eyes. Eyes are important symbolism in the novel, and 2nd Cathy's eyes provide a link to 1st Cathy that Heathcliff would rather not be reminded of.

Back

Preview of the back of card 5
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