Writing theorists/terms

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Stage 1 = Scribbling
Make random marks on the page, which aren't related to words or letters. Learning the skill of holding a pencil/crayon, which prepares them for writing. Often talk about what they are scribbling.
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Stage 2 = Mock Handwriting
Practice drawing shapes on paper, but isn't clear what the drawing represents. Letter-like forms being to appear in or with drawings as the first sign of an attempt to write letters (emergent writing)
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Stage 3 = Mock Letters
Children produce random letters, but there's still no awareness of spacing or of matching sounds with symbols.
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Stage 4 = Conventional Letters
Start to match sounds with symbols, writing down the letters that match sounds being heard/spoken. Unlikely to be spaced out. Use initial consonants to represent words (h for horse) Initial letter may be read out as full word as if it was there.
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Stage 5 = Invented Spelling
Most words are spelled phonetically, though some simple and familiar words are spelled correctly.
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Stage 6 = Appropriate Spelling
Sentences become more complex as the child becomes more aware of standard spelling patterns. Writing becomes more legible.
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Stage 7 = Correct Spelling
Most words are spelt correctly. Older children have usually started to use joined-up writing too.
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Observation/Comment
The first sentence presents an observation, the second an evaluative comment. Sometimes in longer pieces observation and comment are interspersed.
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Observation
Rothery and collegues found that teachers consistently rated texts containing observation only less highly than those with added comment.
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Recount
Usually chronologically organised sequence of events. More mature pieces go Orientation/Event/Reorientation. Recount is more of a narrative genre, however in a recount events proceed smoothly.
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Report
Gives factual objective description of events or objects. More mature reports have schematic structure - General Classification/Description. Reports differ from Recounts as there's no chronological sequence of events.
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Narrative
Includes a problem/complication that has to be resolved for better or for worse. Starts with a Orientation which indicates spatial setting, then a Complication then Resolution sometimes with a Coda at the end, point of telling the story.
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Other cards in this set

Card 2

Front

Stage 2 = Mock Handwriting

Back

Practice drawing shapes on paper, but isn't clear what the drawing represents. Letter-like forms being to appear in or with drawings as the first sign of an attempt to write letters (emergent writing)

Card 3

Front

Stage 3 = Mock Letters

Back

Preview of the front of card 3

Card 4

Front

Stage 4 = Conventional Letters

Back

Preview of the front of card 4

Card 5

Front

Stage 5 = Invented Spelling

Back

Preview of the front of card 5
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