Virgil'sAeneid

Books I, II, IV, V, VI, VII,VIII, X, XI, XII

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  • Created by: Livvy
  • Created on: 26-05-15 14:40
“I sing of arms and of the man, fated to be an exile … at the hands of the heavenly gods”
Book I
1 of 90
“The fierce and unforgetting anger of Juno”
Book I
2 of 90
“So heavy was the cost of founding the Roman race”
Book I
3 of 90
“Aeneas, who loved his men”
Book I
4 of 90
Aeneas to his men: “we have suffered worse before, and this too will pass”
Book I
5 of 90
“He showed them the face of hope, and kept his misery deep in his heart”
Book I
6 of 90
Jupiter on Aeneas’ fate: “The reign of his son Ascanius … [shall last] thirty long years”
Book I
7 of 90
Jupiter on Aeneas’ fate: “on them I impose no limits of time or place. I have given them an empire that will know no end.”
Book I
8 of 90
Aeneas to a disguised Venus: “I am Aeneas, known for my devotion”
Book I
9 of 90
“Venus was afraid of the treacherous house of Carthage and the double-tongued people of Tyre”
Book I
10 of 90
“So the doomed Dido was drawing out the night”
Book I
11 of 90
“Dido of Sidon was amazed at her first sight of him”
Book I
12 of 90
Aeneas introducing his tale: “The sorrow you bid me to bring to life is past all words”
Book II
13 of 90
Laocoon on the Trojan Horse: “Whatever it is, I am afraid of Greeks, even when they bear gifts.”
Book II
14 of 90
Hector to Aeneas: “The enemy is master of the walls and Troy is falling from her highest pinnacle
Book II
15 of 90
“These words added madness to their courage.”
Book II
16 of 90
Anchises to Aeneas: “This is the last light we’ll see and it is calling the defeated.”
Book II
17 of 90
“I saw the dreadful vision of the gods in all their might, the enemies of Troy.”
Book II
18 of 90
Creusa: “Do not fail in your love for our son”
Book II
19 of 90
“I lifted up my father and set out for the mountains.”
Book II
20 of 90
“But the queen had long since been suffering from love’s deadly wound … consumed by its hidden fire.”
Book IV
21 of 90
Dido to Anna: “What a man … his face … courage … warrior!”
Book IV
22 of 90
Dido to Anna: “If there is any baseness in a man, it shows as cowardice.”
Book IV
23 of 90
“With these words Anna lit a fire of wild love in her sister’s breast”
Book IV
24 of 90
“like a wounded doe”
Book IV
25 of 90
“I see my son Ascanius and think of the wrong I am doing him … It is not by my own will I search for Italy.”
Book IV
26 of 90
Dido’s curse: “Let there be war between the nations and between their sons forever.”
Book IV
27 of 90
“So she spoke and while speaking fell upon the sword."
Book IV
28 of 90
“Juno … sent Iris down from Olympus to free her struggling spirit”
Book IV
29 of 90
Aeneas’ crew ponder Dido’s fate: “they knew well … what a woman was capable of when driven to madness.”
Book V
30 of 90
Preparing for the games: “Each bought what gifts he could and gladly offered them … they heaped altars and slaughtered bullocks”
Book V
31 of 90
“For each ship there was a gift … in addition the captains were singled out for special honours”
Book V
32 of 90
"Aeneas sat down on a raised platform in the middle of the concourse”
Book V
33 of 90
Aeneas to the runners: “No man of you will leave without winning a prize from my hand”
Book V
34 of 90
Acestes causes a miracle: “At his a sudden miracle appeared before our eyes, a mighty sign of what the future held in store … the arrow burst into flames and marked its path with fire”
Book V
35 of 90
Aeneas discovers the empty helm: “Grieving to the heart at the loss of his dear friend, he cried out”
Book V
36 of 90
“At last they glided to land at … Cumae”
Book VI
37 of 90
The Sibyl: “A second Achilles is already born in Latium … Juno too is part of the Trojan destiny”
Book VI
38 of 90
"Aeneas seized the branch instantly. It resisted, but he broke it off impatiently”
Book VI
39 of 90
“Dido … rushed away, hating him, into the shadows of the wood where Sychaeus … answered her grief with grief and her love with love.”
Book VI
40 of 90
“Roman … govern the peoples of the world in your empire. These will be your arts – and to impose a settled pattern upon peace, to pardon the defeated and war down the proud”
Book VI
41 of 90
On the death of Marcellus: “This will be the greatest grief you and yours will ever suffer”
Book VI
42 of 90
“told him … how he could avoid or endure all the trials that lay before him”
Book VI
43 of 90
“There on that night did Anchises walk with his son … as he sent them on their journey”
Book VI
44 of 90
The first miracle: “To this tree there came by some miracle a cloud of bees …”
Book VII
45 of 90
The second miracle: “Her long hair caught fire … soon she was wrapped in smoke and a yellow glare”
Book VII
46 of 90
Faunus (or his prophet): “Do not seek to join your daughter in marriage to a Latin.”
Book VII
47 of 90
“Setting out their banquets on wheaten cakes … suddenly Iulus said, as a joke: “Look! We are eating even our tables!”
Book VII
48 of 90
“As a king he was moved … So this was the fulfilment of the portents sent by the Fates!”
Book VII
49 of 90
“Allecto … dear to her heart were the horrors of war, anger, treachery and vicious accusations”
Book VII
50 of 90
Amata’s rage: “like a spinning top flying under the plaited whip”
Book VII
51 of 90
On Lausus: “He deserved a father whom it would have been more a joy to obey, a father other than Mezentius.”
Book VII
52 of 90
“Great tides of grief flowed in his [Aeneas’] heart”
Book VIII
53 of 90
"He caught sight of a white sow with offspring of the same colour … this sow devout Aeneas offered to you as a sacrifice, even to you, O greatest Juno”
Book VIII
54 of 90
“Our hearts are strong in war. Our spirits are high. Our fighting men are tried and proved.”
Book VIII
55 of 90
“You must mould yourself to be worthy of the god.”
Book VIII
56 of 90
“Fate was calling you when you came to this place”
Book VIII
57 of 90
“But the goddess Venus, bringing her gifts, was at hand, shining among the clouds of heaven”
Book VIII
58 of 90
“Aeneas lifted on to his shoulders the fame and the fate of his descendants.”
Book VIII
59 of 90
Jupiter to the council: “… why have you gone back on your word? … Why is there discord against my express command?”
Book X
60 of 90
Venus to Jupiter: “I no longer give a thought to Empire … I beg of you, father, … Allow my grandson to live.”
Book X
61 of 90
Juno: “Neither man nor god compelled Aeneas to choose the ways of war”
Book X
62 of 90
Jupiter on (is) Fate: “… this day let each man face his own fortune and set his course by his own hopes. Trojan and Rutulian I shall treat alike.”
Book X
63 of 90
“The bold confidence of Turnus never wavered”
Book X
64 of 90
“Pallas marvelled at these proud commands and stood amazed at the sight of Turnus”
Book X
65 of 90
Aeneas hears of Pallas’ death: “Everything that stood before him he harvested with the sword … burning with rage as he look for this Turnus flushed with slaughter.”
Book X
66 of 90
Turnus is saved from battle by Juno: “All-powerful Father, have you decided that I deserve this disgrace? Have you decreed I must endure this punishment?”
Book X
67 of 90
Aeneas killing Lausus “What will the devout Aeneas … give that will be worthy of a heart like yours?”
Book X
68 of 90
Mezentius’ dying words to Aeneas: “ Protect me, I beg you, from their [Etruscan] fury and let me lie in the grave with my son.”
Book X
69 of 90
Aeneas on Pallas: “The land of Italy has lost a great bulwark, and great too is your loss, Iulus”
Book XI
70 of 90
Aeneas to Drances: “I for my part would have been willing to grant them peace when they were still alive … I do not wage war with your people. It was your king who abandoned our sworn friendship”
Book XI
71 of 90
Evander: “A father should not survive his son.”
Book XI
72 of 90
“Greatest in age of first of those who carried the sceptre, Latinus sat in the middle with sadness on his brow”
Book XI
73 of 90
Drances: “Turnus, you where are the single source and cause of all the sufferings in Latium … War will never save us.”
Book XI
74 of 90
“With her went the maiden Lavinia, the cause of all this suffering, her lovely eyes downcast.”
Book XI
75 of 90
“Turnus recognised Aeneas advancing relentlessly under arms”
Book XI
76 of 90
Turnus: “I shall go and face him with my spirits high were he mightier than Achilles”
Book XI
77 of 90
On Camilla “they were like the Amazons of Thrace … a great howling tumult.”
Book XI
78 of 90
“… as her life left her with a groan and fled in anger down to the shades.”
Book XI
79 of 90
Opis: “’Come, even a man can die by the weapons of Diana!’”
Book XI
80 of 90
“when he [Turnus] realised that the time had come to honour his promises and that all eyes were on him, no more was needed. … ‘Turnus keeps no man waiting.’”
Book XII
81 of 90
“When Lavinia heard these words from her mother, her burning cheeks were bathed in tears and the deep flush glowed and spread over her face.”
Book XII
82 of 90
“Aeneas meanwhile … was no less ferocious … He too was sharpening his spirit and rousing himself to anger”
Book XII
83 of 90
“…when the two men appeared before their eyes … they saw at close range the difference in their strength.”
Book XII
84 of 90
“… young men fought and fell under the iron hand of Mars.”
Book XII
85 of 90
Jupiter to Juno: “’Aeneas is a god of this land … and is fated to be raised to the stars.’”
Book XII
86 of 90
Turnus: “’You are fierce, Aeneas, but wild words do not frighten me. It is the gods that cause me to fear, the gods and the enmity of Jupiter.’”
Book XII
87 of 90
“Aeneas … checked his hand, hesitating more and more as the words of Turnus began to move him”
Book XII
88 of 90
“Are you trying to escape me now, wearing the spoils stripped from the body of those I loved? … It is Pallas who exacts the penalty in your guilty blood.”
Book XII
89 of 90
“The limbs of Turnus were dissolved and his life left him with a groan, fleeing in anger down to the shades.”
Book XII
90 of 90

Other cards in this set

Card 2

Front

“The fierce and unforgetting anger of Juno”

Back

Book I

Card 3

Front

“So heavy was the cost of founding the Roman race”

Back

Preview of the front of card 3

Card 4

Front

“Aeneas, who loved his men”

Back

Preview of the front of card 4

Card 5

Front

Aeneas to his men: “we have suffered worse before, and this too will pass”

Back

Preview of the front of card 5
View more cards

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