Vaccination (2.2.2)

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What is the UK vaccination programme?
2, 3 & 4 months-diptheria, tetanus, whooping cough, polio, meningitis C, pneumoccal infection. 12/13 months-meningitis, pneumococcal infection, measles, mumps, rubella. 3-5 years-diptheria, tetanus, polio, MMR. 13-18 years-tetanus, diptheria, polio.
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What is a vaccination containing attentuated bacteria or viruses?
A weakened form of the live pathogen- the pathogen is modified in some way so it will still trigger the immune response but won't cause symptoms.
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What happens when the vaccine enters the body?
Specific B and T lymphocytes will be selected and triggered to carry out their particular roles. The B-lymphocytes will form plasma cells (short lived which make specific antibodies) and memory cells. T-lymphocytes also make memory cells.
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What happens in a booster vaccination?
Bigger clone produced, lots of antibody more quickly over a longer period, memory cells survive for a long time.
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What are the risks involved with vaccination?
MMR vaccination- 1/1000 chance of fits. Risks for most vaccinations are minimal and are better than catching the illness.
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What is herd immunity?
If enough people in a community are vaccinated against a disease, it won't be possible for the disease to spread in the population as most people will be immune.
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What is ring vaccination?
When a new case of a disease is reported, everyone in the immediate area is vaccinated straight away.
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What is active immunity?
The body is actively stimulated to make own antibodies & memory cells, causing immunity for that pathogen. Natural- result of infection by pathogen. Artificial- results from vaccination. Results in production of memory cells and long term protection.
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What is passive immunity?
The body's given ready-made antibodies against pathogen. Natural- mother to foetus across placenta. Artificial- injection of ready-made antibodies. Results in short lived immunity, as no memory cells & antibodies given break down after a while.
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What happens if it's too late for a vaccination?
An anti-toxin may be given instead.
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Why will passive immunity not last as long as active immunity?
A person's own immune system has not been stimulated, so no memory cells are produced.
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Card 2

Front

What is a vaccination containing attentuated bacteria or viruses?

Back

A weakened form of the live pathogen- the pathogen is modified in some way so it will still trigger the immune response but won't cause symptoms.

Card 3

Front

What happens when the vaccine enters the body?

Back

Preview of the front of card 3

Card 4

Front

What happens in a booster vaccination?

Back

Preview of the front of card 4

Card 5

Front

What are the risks involved with vaccination?

Back

Preview of the front of card 5
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