Unit 4 - Schizophrenia

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  • Created on: 21-10-14 21:19
What is Schizophrenia?
Schizophrenia is a mental disorder characterised by a profound cognition and impaired emotion.
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What is inter-rater reliability?
Inter-rater reliability is a tool used to measure whether two independent assessors will have the same diagnosis.
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What is test-rater reliabilty?
Whether tests used to deliver these diagnosis are consistent over time.
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What research supports genetic factors being an influencing factor in sz?
Gottesman (Familty studies), Joseph (Twin studies) Tienari et al (Adoption studies)
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Research that supports biochemical involvement in sz?
Comer (2003) - Dopamine hypothesis. Grilly (2002) - Ldopa drug.
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What is cognitive bias?
Suggests that people with schizophren
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What is cognitive bias?
Suggests that people with schizophrenia have selective attention and this causes delusions and auditory hallucinations. (Helmsey's cognitive model offers support to this)
7 of 148
What is cognitive bias?
Suggests that people with schizophrenia have selective attention and this causes delusions and auditory hallucinations. (Helmsey's cognitive model offers support to this)
8 of 148
What is the cognitive deficit theory?
Explains SZ. in terms of attentional impairment
9 of 148
What is cognitive bias?
Suggests that people with schizophrenia have selective attention and this causes delusions and auditory hallucinations. (Helmsey's cognitive model offers support to this)
10 of 148
What is the cognitive deficit theory?
Explains SZ. in terms of attentional impairment (Frith's cognitive model supports this).
11 of 148
What is cognitive bias?
Suggests that people with schizophrenia have selective attention and this causes delusions and auditory hallucinations. (Helmsey's cognitive model offers support to this)
12 of 148
What is the cognitive deficit theory?
Explains SZ. in terms of attentional impairment (Frith's cognitive model supports this).
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What research supports genetic influence within sz?
Gottesman (Family studies), Joseph (Twin studies) and
14 of 148
What is expressed emotion?
When communication within a family has lots of hostility, criticism and emotional over involvement. (Plays a key role in the maintenance of schizophrenia).
15 of 148
What is cognitive bias?
Suggests that people with schizophrenia have selective attention and this causes delusions and auditory hallucinations. (Helmsey's cognitive model offers support to this)
16 of 148
What is the cognitive deficit theory?
Explains SZ. in terms of attentional impairment (Frith's cognitive model supports this).
17 of 148
Research that supports the dopamine hypothesis?
Comer (2003
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What is expressed emotion?
When communication within a family has lots of hostility, criticism and emotional over involvement. (Plays a key role in the maintenance of schizophrenia).
19 of 148
What is cognitive bias?
Suggests that people with schizophrenia have selective attention and this causes delusions and auditory hallucinations. (Helmsey's cognitive model offers support to this)
20 of 148
What is the cognitive deficit theory?
Explains SZ. in terms of attentional impairment (Frith's cognitive model supports this).
21 of 148
Research that supports the dopamine hypothesis?
Comer (2003) and Grilly (2002)
22 of 148
What is expressed emotion?
When communication within a family has lots of hostility, criticism and emotional over involvement. (Plays a key role in the maintenance of schizophrenia).
23 of 148
What is cognitive bias?
Suggests that people with schizophrenia have selective attention and this causes delusions and auditory hallucinations. (Helmsey's cognitive model offers support to this)
24 of 148
What is the cognitive deficit theory?
Explains SZ. in terms of attentional impairment (Frith's cognitive model supports this).
25 of 148
Research that supports the dopamine hypothesis?
Comer (2003) and Grilly (2002)
26 of 148
Research that supports brain structure being a factor of sz?
Torrey (2002), Brown (1986), Flaum (1
27 of 148
Research that supports brain structure being a factor of sz?
Torrey (2002), Brown (1986), Flaum (1995) and Buchsbaum (1990)
28 of 148
What is a double bind?
Conflicting statements that cause a child to lose their grip on reality, because they believe that their thoughts and feelings are unreliable indicators of reality.
29 of 148
What is expressed emotion?
When communication within a family has lots of hostility, criticism and emotional over involvement. (Plays a key role in the maintenance of schizophrenia).
30 of 148
What is cognitive bias?
Suggests that people with schizophrenia have selective attention and this causes delusions and auditory hallucinations. (Helmsey's cognitive model offers support to this)
31 of 148
What is the cognitive deficit theory?
Explains SZ. in terms of attentional impairment (Frith's cognitive model supports this).
32 of 148
Research that supports brain structure being a factor of sz?
Torrey (2002), Brown (1986), Flaum (1995) and Buchsbaum (1990)
33 of 148
What is a double bind?
Conflicting statements that cause a child to lose their grip on reality, because they believe that their thoughts and feelings are unreliable indicators of reality.
34 of 148
What is expressed emotion?
When communication within a family has lots of hostility, criticism and emotional over involvement. (Plays a key role in the maintenance of schizophrenia).
35 of 148
What is cognitive bias?
Suggests that people with schizophrenia have selective attention and this causes delusions and auditory hallucinations. (Helmsey's cognitive model offers support to this)
36 of 148
What is the cognitive deficit theory?
Explains SZ. in terms of attentional impairment (Frith's cognitive model supports this).
37 of 148
Research that supports brain structure being a factor of sz?
Torrey (2002), Brown (1986), Flaum (1995) and Buchsbaum (1990)
38 of 148
What is a double bind?
Conflicting statements that cause a child to lose their grip on reality, because they believe that their thoughts and feelings are unreliable indicators of reality.
39 of 148
What is expressed emotion?
When communication within a family has lots of hostility, criticism and emotional over involvement. (Plays a key role in the maintenance of schizophrenia).
40 of 148
What is cognitive bias?
Suggests that people with schizophrenia have selective attention and this causes delusions and auditory hallucinations. (Helmsey's cognitive model offers support to this)
41 of 148
What is the cognitive deficit theory?
Explains SZ. in terms of attentional impairment (Frith's cognitive model supports this).
42 of 148
What is a typical antipsychotic?
First generation drugs developed in the 1950s E.g
43 of 148
Research that supports brain structure being a factor of sz?
Torrey (2002), Brown (1986), Flaum (1995) and Buchsbaum (1990)
44 of 148
What is a double bind?
Conflicting statements that cause a child to lose their grip on reality, because they believe that their thoughts and feelings are unreliable indicators of reality.
45 of 148
What is expressed emotion?
When communication within a family has lots of hostility, criticism and emotional over involvement. (Plays a key role in the maintenance of schizophrenia).
46 of 148
What is cognitive bias?
Suggests that people with schizophrenia have selective attention and this causes delusions and auditory hallucinations. (Helmsey's cognitive model offers support to this)
47 of 148
What is the cognitive deficit theory?
Explains SZ. in terms of attentional impairment (Frith's cognitive model supports this).
48 of 148
What is a typical antipsychotic?
First generation drugs developed in the 1950s E.g Haloperidol. Can't stop the amount of dopamine being transmitted but can reduce the amount being transmitted. Blocks off D2 receptors.
49 of 148
Research that supports brain structure being a factor of sz?
Torrey (2002), Brown (1986), Flaum (1995) and Buchsbaum (1990)
50 of 148
What is a double bind?
Conflicting statements that cause a child to lose their grip on reality, because they believe that their thoughts and feelings are unreliable indicators of reality.
51 of 148
What is expressed emotion?
When communication within a family has lots of hostility, criticism and emotional over involvement. (Plays a key role in the maintenance of schizophrenia).
52 of 148
What is cognitive bias?
Suggests that people with schizophrenia have selective attention and this causes delusions and auditory hallucinations. (Helmsey's cognitive model offers support to this)
53 of 148
What is the cognitive deficit theory?
Explains SZ. in terms of attentional impairment (Frith's cognitive model supports this).
54 of 148
What is a typical antipsychotic?
First generation drugs developed in the 1950s E.g Haloperidol. Can't stop the amount of dopamine being transmitted but can reduce the amount being transmitted. Blocks off D2 receptors.
55 of 148
What is an atypical antipsychotic?
Second/newer generation drug, developing in the 1990s. E.g Clozapine.
56 of 148
Research that supports brain structure being a factor of sz?
Torrey (2002), Brown (1986), Flaum (1995) and Buchsbaum (1990)
57 of 148
What is a double bind?
Conflicting statements that cause a child to lose their grip on reality, because they believe that their thoughts and feelings are unreliable indicators of reality.
58 of 148
What is expressed emotion?
When communication within a family has lots of hostility, criticism and emotional over involvement. (Plays a key role in the maintenance of schizophrenia).
59 of 148
What is cognitive bias?
Suggests that people with schizophrenia have selective attention and this causes delusions and auditory hallucinations. (Helmsey's cognitive model offers support to this)
60 of 148
What is the cognitive deficit theory?
Explains SZ. in terms of attentional impairment (Frith's cognitive model supports this).
61 of 148
What is a typical antipsychotic?
First generation drugs developed in the 1950s E.g Haloperidol. Can't stop the amount of dopamine being transmitted but can reduce the amount being transmitted. Blocks off D2 receptors.
62 of 148
What is an atypical antipsychotic?
Second/newer generation drug, developing in the 1990s. E.g Clozapine. Only attach to the specific D2 receptor
63 of 148
Research that supports brain structure being a factor of sz?
Torrey (2002), Brown (1986), Flaum (1995) and Buchsbaum (1990)
64 of 148
What is a double bind?
Conflicting statements that cause a child to lose their grip on reality, because they believe that their thoughts and feelings are unreliable indicators of reality.
65 of 148
What is expressed emotion?
When communication within a family has lots of hostility, criticism and emotional over involvement. (Plays a key role in the maintenance of schizophrenia).
66 of 148
What is cognitive bias?
Suggests that people with schizophrenia have selective attention and this causes delusions and auditory hallucinations. (Helmsey's cognitive model offers support to this)
67 of 148
What is the cognitive deficit theory?
Explains SZ. in terms of attentional impairment (Frith's cognitive model supports this).
68 of 148
What is a typical antipsychotic?
First generation drugs developed in the 1950s E.g Haloperidol. Can't stop the amount of dopamine being transmitted but can reduce the amount being transmitted. Blocks off D2 receptors.
69 of 148
What is an atypical antipsychotic?
Second/newer generation drug, developing in the 1990s. E.g Clozapine. Only attach to the specific D2 receptors and are said to also block of some serotonin. (See Kapur and Remington).
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What is CBT?
Cognitive behaviour
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Research that supports brain structure being a factor of sz?
Torrey (2002), Brown (1986), Flaum (1995) and Buchsbaum (1990)
72 of 148
What is a double bind?
Conflicting statements that cause a child to lose their grip on reality, because they believe that their thoughts and feelings are unreliable indicators of reality.
73 of 148
What is expressed emotion?
When communication within a family has lots of hostility, criticism and emotional over involvement. (Plays a key role in the maintenance of schizophrenia).
74 of 148
What is cognitive bias?
Suggests that people with schizophrenia have selective attention and this causes delusions and auditory hallucinations. (Helmsey's cognitive model offers support to this)
75 of 148
What is the cognitive deficit theory?
Explains SZ. in terms of attentional impairment (Frith's cognitive model supports this).
76 of 148
What is a typical antipsychotic?
First generation drugs developed in the 1950s E.g Haloperidol. Can't stop the amount of dopamine being transmitted but can reduce the amount being transmitted. Blocks off D2 receptors.
77 of 148
What is an atypical antipsychotic?
Second/newer generation drug, developing in the 1990s. E.g Clozapine. Only attach to the specific D2 receptors and are said to also block of some serotonin. (See Kapur and Remington).
78 of 148
What is CBT?
Cognitive behavioural therapy (Beck and Ellis). The form of CBT used for schizophrenics is personal therapy (looks at a particular issue/symptom).
79 of 148
Research that supports brain structure being a factor of sz?
Torrey (2002), Brown (1986), Flaum (1995) and Buchsbaum (1990)
80 of 148
What is a double bind?
Conflicting statements that cause a child to lose their grip on reality, because they believe that their thoughts and feelings are unreliable indicators of reality.
81 of 148
What is expressed emotion?
When communication within a family has lots of hostility, criticism and emotional over involvement. (Plays a key role in the maintenance of schizophrenia).
82 of 148
What is cognitive bias?
Suggests that people with schizophrenia have selective attention and this causes delusions and auditory hallucinations. (Helmsey's cognitive model offers support to this)
83 of 148
What is the cognitive deficit theory?
Explains SZ. in terms of attentional impairment (Frith's cognitive model supports this).
84 of 148
What is a typical antipsychotic?
First generation drugs developed in the 1950s E.g Haloperidol. Can't stop the amount of dopamine being transmitted but can reduce the amount being transmitted. Blocks off D2 receptors.
85 of 148
What is an atypical antipsychotic?
Second/newer generation drug, developing in the 1990s. E.g Clozapine. Only attach to the specific D2 receptors and are said to also block of some serotonin. (See Kapur and Remington).
86 of 148
What is CBT?
Cognitive behavioural therapy (Beck and Ellis). The form of CBT used for schizophrenics is personal therapy (looks at a particular issue/symptom).
87 of 148
Research that supports brain structure being a factor of sz?
Torrey (2002), Brown (1986), Flaum (1995) and Buchsbaum (1990)
88 of 148
What is a double bind?
Conflicting statements that cause a child to lose their grip on reality, because they believe that their thoughts and feelings are unreliable indicators of reality.
89 of 148
What is expressed emotion?
When communication within a family has lots of hostility, criticism and emotional over involvement. (Plays a key role in the maintenance of schizophrenia).
90 of 148
What is cognitive bias?
Suggests that people with schizophrenia have selective attention and this causes delusions and auditory hallucinations. (Helmsey's cognitive model offers support to this)
91 of 148
What is the cognitive deficit theory?
Explains SZ. in terms of attentional impairment (Frith's cognitive model supports this).
92 of 148
What is a typical antipsychotic?
First generation drugs developed in the 1950s E.g Haloperidol. Can't stop the amount of dopamine being transmitted but can reduce the amount being transmitted. Blocks off D2 receptors.
93 of 148
What is an atypical antipsychotic?
Second/newer generation drug, developing in the 1990s. E.g Clozapine. Only attach to the specific D2 receptors and are said to also block of some serotonin. (See Kapur and Remington).
94 of 148
What is CBT?
Cognitive behavioural therapy (Beck and Ellis). The form of CBT used for schizophrenics is personal therapy (looks at a particular issue/symptom).
95 of 148
What is CSE?
Coping Strategy Enhancement (Tarrier). In
96 of 148
Research that supports brain structure being a factor of sz?
Torrey (2002), Brown (1986), Flaum (1995) and Buchsbaum (1990)
97 of 148
What is a double bind?
Conflicting statements that cause a child to lose their grip on reality, because they believe that their thoughts and feelings are unreliable indicators of reality.
98 of 148
What is expressed emotion?
When communication within a family has lots of hostility, criticism and emotional over involvement. (Plays a key role in the maintenance of schizophrenia).
99 of 148
What is cognitive bias?
Suggests that people with schizophrenia have selective attention and this causes delusions and auditory hallucinations. (Helmsey's cognitive model offers support to this)
100 of 148
What is the cognitive deficit theory?
Explains SZ. in terms of attentional impairment (Frith's cognitive model supports this).
101 of 148
What is a typical antipsychotic?
First generation drugs developed in the 1950s E.g Haloperidol. Can't stop the amount of dopamine being transmitted but can reduce the amount being transmitted. Blocks off D2 receptors.
102 of 148
What is an atypical antipsychotic?
Second/newer generation drug, developing in the 1990s. E.g Clozapine. Only attach to the specific D2 receptors and are said to also block of some serotonin. (See Kapur and Remington).
103 of 148
What is CBT?
Cognitive behavioural therapy (Beck and Ellis). The form of CBT used for schizophrenics is personal therapy (looks at a particular issue/symptom).
104 of 148
What is CSE?
Coping Strategy Enhancement (Tarrier). Involves two coponents: Education and rapport and symptom targetting.
105 of 148
What is a double bind?
Conflicting statements that cause a child to lose their grip on reality, because they believe that their thoughts and feelings are unreliable indicators of reality.
106 of 148
What is expressed emotion?
When communication within a family
107 of 148
What is a double bind?
Conflicting statements that cause a child to lose their grip on reality, because they believe that their thoughts and feelings are unreliable indicators of reality.
108 of 148
What is expressed emotion?
When communication within a family
109 of 148
What is a double bind?
Conflicting statements that cause a child to lose their grip on reality, because they believe that their thoughts and feelings are unreliable indicators of reality.
110 of 148
What is expressed emotion?
When communication within a family
111 of 148
Research that supports brain structure being an influencing factor in sz?
Torrey (2002), Brown et al (1986), Flaum (
112 of 148
What is a double bind?
Conflicting statements that cause a child to lose their grip on reality, because they believe that their thoughts and feelings are unreliable indicators of reality.
113 of 148
What is expressed emotion?
When communication within a family
114 of 148
Research that supports brain structure being an influencing factor in sz?
Torrey (2002), Brown et al (1986), Flaum (1995) and Buchsbaum (1990)
115 of 148
What is a double bind?
Conflicting statements that cause a child to lose their grip on reality, because they believe that their thoughts and feelings are unreliable indicators of reality.
116 of 148
What is expressed emotion?
When communication within a family
117 of 148
Typical antipsychotic?
F
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Research that supports brain structure being an influencing factor in sz?
Torrey (2002), Brown et al (1986), Flaum (1995) and Buchsbaum (1990)
119 of 148
What is a double bind?
Conflicting statements that cause a child to lose their grip on reality, because they believe that their thoughts and feelings are unreliable indicators of reality.
120 of 148
What is expressed emotion?
When communication within a family
121 of 148
Typical antipsychotic?
First generation drugs, developed in 1950s. E.g. Haloperidol. Blocks off some D2 receptors.
122 of 148
Atypical antipsychotic?
Second/newer generation drugs, develope
123 of 148
Research that supports brain structure being an influencing factor in sz?
Torrey (2002), Brown et al (1986), Flaum (1995) and Buchsbaum (1990)
124 of 148
What is a double bind?
Conflicting statements that cause a child to lose their grip on reality, because they believe that their thoughts and feelings are unreliable indicators of reality.
125 of 148
What is expressed emotion?
When communication within a family
126 of 148
Typical antipsychotic?
First generation drugs, developed in 1950s. E.g. Haloperidol. Blocks off some D2 receptors.
127 of 148
Atypical antipsychotic?
Second/newer generation drugs, developed in 1990s. E.g Clozapine. Attaches to specific D2 receptors and is said to block off some serotonin aswell (See Kapur and Remington study).
128 of 148
Research that supports brain structure being an influencing factor in sz?
Torrey (2002), Brown et al (1986), Flaum (1995) and Buchsbaum (1990)
129 of 148
What is a double bind?
Conflicting statements that cause a child to lose their grip on reality, because they believe that their thoughts and feelings are unreliable indicators of reality.
130 of 148
What is expressed emotion?
When communication within a family
131 of 148
Typical antipsychotic?
First generation drugs, developed in 1950s. E.g. Haloperidol. Blocks off some D2 receptors.
132 of 148
Atypical antipsychotic?
Second/newer generation drugs, developed in 1990s. E.g Clozapine. Attaches to specific D2 receptors and is said to block off some serotonin aswell (See Kapur and Remington study).
133 of 148
What is CBT?
Cognitive behavioural therapy (Beck and Ellis).
134 of 148
Research that supports brain structure being an influencing factor in sz?
Torrey (2002), Brown et al (1986), Flaum (1995) and Buchsbaum (1990)
135 of 148
What is a double bind?
Conflicting statements that cause a child to lose their grip on reality, because they believe that their thoughts and feelings are unreliable indicators of reality.
136 of 148
What is expressed emotion?
When communication within a family
137 of 148
Typical antipsychotic?
First generation drugs, developed in 1950s. E.g. Haloperidol. Blocks off some D2 receptors.
138 of 148
Atypical antipsychotic?
Second/newer generation drugs, developed in 1990s. E.g Clozapine. Attaches to specific D2 receptors and is said to block off some serotonin aswell (See Kapur and Remington study).
139 of 148
What is CBT?
Cognitive behavioural therapy (Beck and Ellis).
140 of 148
Whats is CSE?
Coping Strategy Enhancement (Tarrier). Involves two components: education and rapport and symptom targetting.
141 of 148
Research that supports brain structure being an influencing factor in sz?
Torrey (2002), Brown et al (1986), Flaum (1995) and Buchsbaum (1990)
142 of 148
What is a double bind?
Conflicting statements that cause a child to lose their grip on reality, because they believe that their thoughts and feelings are unreliable indicators of reality.
143 of 148
What is expressed emotion?
When communication within a family
144 of 148
Typical antipsychotic?
First generation drugs, developed in 1950s. E.g. Haloperidol. Blocks off some D2 receptors.
145 of 148
Atypical antipsychotic?
Second/newer generation drugs, developed in 1990s. E.g Clozapine. Attaches to specific D2 receptors and is said to block off some serotonin aswell (See Kapur and Remington study).
146 of 148
What is CBT?
Cognitive behavioural therapy (Beck and Ellis).
147 of 148
Whats is CSE?
Coping Strategy Enhancement (Tarrier). Involves two components: education and rapport and symptom targeting.
148 of 148

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Card 2

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What is inter-rater reliability?

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Inter-rater reliability is a tool used to measure whether two independent assessors will have the same diagnosis.

Card 3

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What is test-rater reliabilty?

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Preview of the front of card 3

Card 4

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What research supports genetic factors being an influencing factor in sz?

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Card 5

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Research that supports biochemical involvement in sz?

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