UNIT 1- Attachment

HideShow resource information
Van Ijzendorn and Kroonberg
Investigated different attachments in different cultures. Meta analysis, 32 studies in 8 different countries.
1 of 20
Clarke-Stewart
150 children in Chicago. Day care- more advanced peer relationships and learned how to cope with social situations and to negotiate with peers.
2 of 20
Campbell, Lamb and Hwang
Swedish children that attended day continuously from 18months-3.5 years compared to home children. Long days at nursery under 3.5 were less socially competent.
3 of 20
NICHD Study
Investigated quality of care, quantity and types of care. 54 months. Important variables, maternity sensitivity and quality of care.
4 of 20
Melhursh
Comparing different types of day care. Quasi experiment. Language skills best in parent care. Nursery showed higher levels of prosocial behavious.
5 of 20
Tizard and Hodges
Long term effects of children brought up in their home until the age of 4.
6 of 20
Schaffer and Emerson
60 babies in Glasgow. Measured separation anxiety and stranger distress (A-25/32 weeks and SD month after). Parent rated 0-3 on observations. PCG, 65% mother, 3% father and 27% joint.
7 of 20
Rutter et al
Romanian orphans compared to UK orphans that both get adopted in the UK.
8 of 20
Harlow and Harlow, 1 year later, Harlow and Zimmerman
8 Infant monkeys. Soft and wire surrogate mother, wire mother feeds and soft comforts when mechanical noisy toy scares monkey.
9 of 20
Bowbly's 44 Thieves
Comparison to delinquent criminal and disturbed children. Distribution to attachment process inability to form relationships with others. Lack of moral constraints on behaviour and delinquent or criminal behaviour.
10 of 20
PDD Model
Protest, Despair and Detachment. Immediate response to separation.
11 of 20
Lorenz
Geese imprinting. Critical period of 13-16 hours. Attachment won't happen after 36 hours.
12 of 20
Operant conditioning
Learning via reinforcement (reward and punishment).
13 of 20
Classical conditioning
Learning via association.
14 of 20
Bowlby's Theory
Infants and careers have innate programming to become attached, social releasers. As is a biological process, occurs in critical period or not at all. Plays a role in later development (continuity hypothesis) by providing an internal working model.
15 of 20
Social learning theory
Indirectly through reinforcement and modelling.
16 of 20
Mary Ainsworth
Strange situations, 8 steps. Secure 70%, insecure avoid ant 15% and insecure resistant 15%.
17 of 20
Pavlov
Classical condoning. Food, unconditioned stimulus, produces a sense of pleasure, unconditioned response. Food becomes associated with the person doing the feeding who then becomes a conditioned stimulus, also producing a sense of pleasure.
18 of 20
Hay and Vespo
Social learning theory proposes that learning can take place indirectly through vicarious reinforcement and modelling. Suggested that attachment occurs because children learn to imitate the affection shown by their parents which they then give.
19 of 20
Dollard and Miller
Operant conditioning. Hungry infant feels uncomfortable which creates drive to lessen discomfort. Being fed reduces this. Drive reduction is rewarding and the infant learns that food is a reward for primary reinforcer.
20 of 20

Other cards in this set

Card 2

Front

150 children in Chicago. Day care- more advanced peer relationships and learned how to cope with social situations and to negotiate with peers.

Back

Clarke-Stewart

Card 3

Front

Swedish children that attended day continuously from 18months-3.5 years compared to home children. Long days at nursery under 3.5 were less socially competent.

Back

Preview of the back of card 3

Card 4

Front

Investigated quality of care, quantity and types of care. 54 months. Important variables, maternity sensitivity and quality of care.

Back

Preview of the back of card 4

Card 5

Front

Comparing different types of day care. Quasi experiment. Language skills best in parent care. Nursery showed higher levels of prosocial behavious.

Back

Preview of the back of card 5
View more cards

Comments

No comments have yet been made

Similar Psychology resources:

See all Psychology resources »See all Attachment resources »