Unit 3: Key Topic 4.2 (The Beveridge Report: the attack on 'want')

HideShow resource information
WHY WAS THE BEVERIDGE REPORT SET UP?
(Title)
1 of 39
What are 'Social Security Schemes'?
Schemes imposed and controlled by the government with the purpose of providing social benefits to (sections of) the community.
2 of 39
Why did the government look into improving Britain's social security?
The government had portrayed the war as a People's War and therefore there had to be come clear benefits for the sacrifices that were being made.
3 of 39
What had people hoped for the future of Britain's social security?
That the government would reform social security in order to cover more of the population.
4 of 39
What had people hoped for the future of Britain's healthcare?
That it would be improved, where large numbers had to pay for treatment and frequently did not have the funds to do so.
5 of 39
What measures were taken during wartime to improve health? (include date)
In 1940, free milk was given to school children and hospital treatment was reformed.
6 of 39
Why was hospital treatment reformed?
It was unrealistic to expect people to pay for treatment if their houses had been bombed.
7 of 39
When was a committee set up to look into these problems? By who?
In 1941, by Arthur Greenwood (a labour Cabinet minister)
8 of 39
What was the aim of this committee?
To look into the provision of health insurance in Britain.
9 of 39
Define provision.
The action of providing or supplying something for use.'
10 of 39
Who was appointed chairman?
William Beveridge
11 of 39
What was William Beveridge's role?
To look into all social insurance schemes (including those run by the state, private insurance companies and employers schemes). He was expected to simplify the systems.
12 of 39
Define social insurance schemes.
A plan whereby an individual would seek cover against illness, injury, unemployment and old age by contributing a certain amount of money each week.
13 of 39
What was the problem with the current social insurance schemes?
Although the government provided for many of its citizens, there was a range of public and private schemes.
14 of 39
How many people were eligible for old age pensions before the Beveridge Report? (Include a year)
In 1939, 21 million people
15 of 39
How many people were covered by government unemployment insurance? (Include a year)
In 1939, 15.5 million people
16 of 39
How many people were covered by national health insurance? (include a year)
In 1939, 20 million people
17 of 39
What fraction of people were covered by national health insurance? (Include a year)
In 1939, no more than half
18 of 39
How did Beveridge move beyond what he was asked to do?
By looking at all aspects of social problems
19 of 39
What did Beveridge recognise?
What he (and his committee) saw for the future was already happening. The government was becoming more involved in the lives of ordinary people to ensure a secure existence.
20 of 39
Despite this, what was the problem?
The issue for Beveridge was to persuade politicians to accept increased peacetime government involvement.
21 of 39
What was the report named?
'Social Insurance and Allied Services'
22 of 39
When was the report published?
1st December 1942
23 of 39
How many copies were sold? (include timeframe)
Within weeks, 635,000 copies
24 of 39
How many people had heard of the report? (include timeframe and source)
Within 2 weeks of its publication, a public poll said: 19/20 people had heard of the report
25 of 39
How many people liked the report? (include source and expand on 'liked')
A poll said: 9/10 people wanted its proposals to be carried out
26 of 39
Did the report have the support of the press?
The British press, with the exception of the Daily Telegraph, welcomed the report.
27 of 39
WHAT WERE THE RECOMMENDATIONS OF THE BEVERIDGE REPORT?
(Title)
28 of 39
What were the five main recommendations of the Beveridge Report?
1) compulsory insurance scheme 2) Marriage Grant 3. Maternity Grant and Benefit 4. Family Allowance for the Second Child (and subsequent children) 5. Death Grant
29 of 39
Why was the compulsory Insurance scheme set up?
To eliminate poverty!
30 of 39
How would the insurance scheme run? (i.e. Be funded?)
Contributions by every worker, employer and the government.
31 of 39
What are the 3 main things the contributions would go towards?
1. Benefits 2. Pensions 3. Workers
32 of 39
How would benefits be distributed?
The contributions would help fund benefits for the sick, unemployed or those suffering from industrial injury. Benefits would also be given to widows.
33 of 39
How would it benefit workers?
The scheme would support the worker and enable him and his family to survive in times of hardship.
34 of 39
Define Grant
A sum of money given by a government (or organisation) for a particular cause.
35 of 39
What were the 4 main reasons for the popularity of the Beveridge Report?
1.Receive benefits and grant 2. Ends the Means Test (1930s) 3. looked after individuals from "Cradle to Grave" 4. Minimum standard of living
36 of 39
What did Beveridge argue the advantages of the Beveridge Report were?
Beveridge argued it would provide a minimum standard of living "below which no-one should be allowed to fall"
37 of 39
How did people mock the Beveridge Report?
Sarcastically people said it looked after people from "Womb to Tomb" (rather than "Cradle to Grave")
38 of 39
ATTACKING THE 5 GIANTS
(Title)
39 of 39

Other cards in this set

Card 2

Front

What are 'Social Security Schemes'?

Back

Schemes imposed and controlled by the government with the purpose of providing social benefits to (sections of) the community.

Card 3

Front

Why did the government look into improving Britain's social security?

Back

Preview of the front of card 3

Card 4

Front

What had people hoped for the future of Britain's social security?

Back

Preview of the front of card 4

Card 5

Front

What had people hoped for the future of Britain's healthcare?

Back

Preview of the front of card 5
View more cards

Comments

No comments have yet been made

Similar History resources:

See all History resources »See all Changes in British society during the 20th century resources »