Understanding Relationships- WK 5 Perceiving Individuals

What is NOT a reason why we form and remember impressions of individuals?
To form only romantic relationships
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What is NOT a raw material of first impressions?
Individual's lifestyle habits
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What is the definition of a mental representation?
A body of knowledge that an individual has stored in their memory
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What can be the consequence of mere exposure effect?
Can lead to positive feelings
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What was the sample in Walster, Aronson, Abrahams and Rottman (1966) study?
College students
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What was the main finding from Walster, Aronson, Abrahamas and Rottman (1966) study?
The partners physical attractiveness was the most important influence on both male & female satisfaction
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What was the main finding of Moreland & Beach's (1992) study?
Women who were seen more were rated as warmer and more intelligent
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What is the correct definition of salience?
The ability of a cue to attract attention in its context
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What is NOT an example of salience?
A student with their ears pierced
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How can people be salient?
All three
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How do we interpret cues?
Automatically in light of our existing knowledge (mental representations)
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What is most likely to be used when interpreting cues?
All three
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A mental representation that has recently been activated remains accessible - true or false?
True
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What is the correct definition of the "accessibility of knowledge"?
The ease and speed in which knowledge comes to mind and is used
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What is the definition of priming?
When a concept has been used even in an unrelated context
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Who developed the mere exposure effect (1968)?
Zajonc
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What is the definition of correspondence bias?
People attach a trait to a person even when not justified by these criteria
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What is the definition of a correspondence inference?
Process of characterising someone as having a personality trait that is consistent with their observed behaviour
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In what type of processing is your first impression unlikely to change?
Superficial processing
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What type of processing takes a wider range of information into account?
Systematic processing
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What is the definition of causal attributions?
A judgment about the cause of a behaviour
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What was Kelleys (1967) argument for the explanation of behaviour?
Something about the actor, target of the behaviour and situation
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What are three important factors of Kelley's (1967) covariation model?
Consistency, distinctiveness & consensus of a person's behaviour
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If Lizzie laughs at a comedian and other people laugh as well - what is this an example of?
High consensus
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In Gilbert, Pelham & Krulls (1988) study how did "non-busy" participants see the woman in the video?
Non-busy participants appropriately discounted the women's anxiety
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What is the definition of fundamental attribution error?
The tendency to overemphasise internal explanations for the behaviour of others and not identify the power of the situation
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Why do people make the fundamental attribution error?
People are more likely to to take the situation into account when explaining their own behaviour
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In what type of processing does correspondence inferences occur?
Superficial processing
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Which process integrates several attributes into decision making about others?
Systematic processing
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What is an example of conservatism?
Primacy effect
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What process did the study by Rosenthal et al (1968) look at?
Self fulfilling prophecy
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Why is discounting original correspondence inferences difficult?
All three
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What was the main finding from Ji, Nisbett & Su's study (2001)?
People from collectivist cultures are more likely to perceive that people’s behaviour can change with the social context
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What is NOT a form of non-verbal communication?
Attractiveness
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What study shows how self-fulfilling prophecy impacts students?
Rosenthal et al (1968)
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What statement is NOT an example of why first impressions matter?
To override sensory information
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Donald thinks that Lizzie is a nice person & would be the first person to offer help if he needed it. Donald also remembers the first date he had with Lizzie. This body of knowledge that Donald has stored in his memory about Lizzie is known as:
Cognitive representation
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What was the main finding in Asch's results?
Central traits like (warm/cold) influenced impression formation and peripheral ones (polite/blunt) did not
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Other cards in this set

Card 2

Front

What is NOT a raw material of first impressions?

Back

Individual's lifestyle habits

Card 3

Front

What is the definition of a mental representation?

Back

Preview of the front of card 3

Card 4

Front

What can be the consequence of mere exposure effect?

Back

Preview of the front of card 4

Card 5

Front

What was the sample in Walster, Aronson, Abrahams and Rottman (1966) study?

Back

Preview of the front of card 5
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