Topic 4: Religion, renewal and choice

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Davie- against secularisation
religion is not declining it is becoming more privatised, believing without belonging
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Davie- vicarious religion
Where a small number of professional clergy practise religion in behalf of a much larger number of people, who experience it at second hand
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Bibby-supports Davie
Canadian survey, 25% attend church regularly but 80% said they had religious beliefs
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Voas and Crockett- criticises Davie
British social attitudes survey 1983-2000 shows both church attendance and belief in God are declining
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Bruce- criticises Davie
If people are not willing to invest time in going to church this reflects the declining strength of their beliefs. When people no longer believe they no longer wish to belong
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Danielle Hervieu-Léger- spiritual shopping
personal choice and believing without belonging
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Lyon- Supports Davie
traditional religions are giving way to a variety of new religious forms
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Stark and Bainbridge- criticise secularisation
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Hadden and Shupe
growth in 'televangalim' in America shows the the level of religious participation is supply-led. in 1960's when commercial funding of religion began it opened competition in which evangelical churches thrived
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Finke
lifting of restrictions on Asian immigration into America in 1960's allowed Asian religions such as Hare Krishna to set up permanently in the USA. Asian faith became another option that was popular in the religious market.
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Bruce- criticises religious market theory
rejects the view that diversity and competition increase the demand for religion. statistics show that diversity has been accomplished by religious decking in Europe and America.
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Bruce- criticises Stark and Bainbridge for misrepresenting secularisation theory
The theory does not claim there was a 'golden age' of religion or that everyone will become atheist, it claims there is a long-term decline. It also does not claim secularisation is universal it just applies to Europe and America.
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Norris and Inglehart- criticise religious market theory
hight levels if religious participation exist I Catholic counties where the church has a near monopoly
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Beckford- criticises religious market theory
It is unsociological because it assumes people are 'naturally' religious and fails to explain why they make the choices they do.
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Gill and Lundegaarde- supper Norris and Inglehart
in the past religion used to provide welfare for the poor and still does in poorer counties, however from the 20th century the state in the West began to provide welfare and this contributed to religious decline. Religion will never disappear.
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Vásquez- criticises Norris and Inglehart
They use quantitative data about income levels, they done examine people's own definitions of 'existential security'
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Vásquez- criticises Norris and Inglehart
They only see religion as a negative response to deprivation, they ignore the positive reasons people have for religious participation and the appear that some types of religion have for the wealthy.
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Card 2

Front

Davie- vicarious religion

Back

Where a small number of professional clergy practise religion in behalf of a much larger number of people, who experience it at second hand

Card 3

Front

Bibby-supports Davie

Back

Preview of the front of card 3

Card 4

Front

Voas and Crockett- criticises Davie

Back

Preview of the front of card 4

Card 5

Front

Bruce- criticises Davie

Back

Preview of the front of card 5
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