theorists

Bowlby's attachment theory
bowlby said that children were born biologically pre-programmed to form attachment with their main carers usually the mother, if this attachment or bond is broken separation anxiety occurs.
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Gesell's maturation theory
children have the ability and skills to develop as the body becomes biologicaly mature. tasks that children can do are completed by different children at different paces and at different stages in their lives.
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Ainsworth's attachment theory
babies pass through the stages of attachment in the same order. Asocial 0-6 weeks - dont show any preference. indiscriminitive 6 weeks- 7 months - smile at everyone and familiar faces. Specific attachment 7-9 months shows stranger fear.
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Ainsworth's attachment theory (2)
multiple attachments 10 months+ - more independent by 18 months they are likely to have lots of attachments.
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Piaget's intellectual development
cognitive development - both nature and maturation set stages and ages and nurture environment learning due to new experiences. (schema)
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Piaget's intellectual development (2)
stages : sensory motor 0-2 years development of object permenance (things still exist even though they cant be seen). pre-operational 2-7 years - child sees the world from other peoples views.
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Piaget's intellectual development (3)
concrete operational 7-11 years - conservation develops the ability understand if nothing has been taken and when something has been added. formal operational 11-18 years - adolescence much more sophisticated view of the world.
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Chomsky's language theory (nature)
language development is under the control of biological forces and infants are pre-programmed to have the ability to learn language.
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Skinner's language theory (nurture)
language is learned from a child's surroundings and environment, a child picks up language that they hear from people around them.
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Bandura's social learning theory
we learn through observation and imitation of role models (bobo doll experiment) role models can be parents, people in the media, peer groups ect...
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Erickson emotional theory (nature and nurture)
as we age we go through a number of conflicts and how we resolve these effects our self-image, self-esteem and self-worth.
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genetic DISEASE
sickle cell disease - People with sickle cell disease produce unusually shaped red blood cells that can cause problems because they don't live as long as healthy blood cells and they can become stuck in blood vessels.
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genetic DISORDER
downs syndrome - floppiness (hypotonia), eyes that slant upwards and outwards, a small mouth with a tongue that may stick out, a flat back of the head, below-average weight and length at birth, their palm may have only one crease across it
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Card 2

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Gesell's maturation theory

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children have the ability and skills to develop as the body becomes biologicaly mature. tasks that children can do are completed by different children at different paces and at different stages in their lives.

Card 3

Front

Ainsworth's attachment theory

Back

Preview of the front of card 3

Card 4

Front

Ainsworth's attachment theory (2)

Back

Preview of the front of card 4

Card 5

Front

Piaget's intellectual development

Back

Preview of the front of card 5
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