Geography Rivers The Thames river basin

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  • Created by: Molly
  • Created on: 06-01-15 09:57
Name the Thames' tributaries
The Cole, Lee, Kennet, Wey & Loddon
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How many litres of water is abstracted from the region's rivers and groundwater daily?
4700 million litres
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What key factors have increased pressure on land use, water resources and the water environment generally?
Growth in housing and commercial development, and in mineral extraction
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Over the past 30 years, demand for what has increased by approx. 1.7% each year?
public water supplies
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Geologically, what key minerals does the area contain much of?
chalk, limestone, gravel & sand
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What is the main use of the river as far as industry is concerned?
They allow for the import and export of raw materials and finished goods.
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What traditional heavy-industries are located in the flat floodplains?
car manufacturing and iron and steel works
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Why are they located here?
Land was cheap and there was water for cooling purposes
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What are the potentials of living on a river basin?
drinking supply, good potential for trade & communications, relatively flat sites for residential & industrial development & fertile silt which is good for farming
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What does much of the conflict in the Thames Drainage basin relate to?
demand for housing
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what type of farming is appropriate for areas that flood?
Livestock farming (animals can be led to dry ground)
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What farming dominates in the lower Thames?
Arable
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Why isn't the Thames used for hydroelectric power?
It is not steep enough & there is not enough 'head' of water to drive turbines
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Which tributary of the Thames was used for grinding grain? (mill)
The Cole
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How has the Thames been used indirectly to generate power?
Much of London's waste is carried by barge to incinerators in the East of London which convert municipal waste into electricity
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What is the name of the extremely important recreational resource within the Thames basin?
The Cotswold Water Park
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Beyond what year will it be necessary to upgrade the barrier and associated flood defences?
2030 (at an est. cost of £4 billion)
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When did the Thames barrier become operational?
October 1982
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On average, the barrier has to close three times per year. However, in 2000/1 how many barrier closures were there?
24
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What is one of the main flood alleviation 'facilities' for Oxford?
Port Meadow
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What does SSSI's stand for?
Sites of Special Scientific Interest
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What are SSSI's?
An area of land of special interest because of its flora, fauna, geological or physiographic characteristics. They should be protected from development.
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What are the positives and negatives to mudflats?
P-Seen as important 'hotspots' for biodiversity. N-Seen as ugly eyesores
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Other cards in this set

Card 2

Front

How many litres of water is abstracted from the region's rivers and groundwater daily?

Back

4700 million litres

Card 3

Front

What key factors have increased pressure on land use, water resources and the water environment generally?

Back

Preview of the front of card 3

Card 4

Front

Over the past 30 years, demand for what has increased by approx. 1.7% each year?

Back

Preview of the front of card 4

Card 5

Front

Geologically, what key minerals does the area contain much of?

Back

Preview of the front of card 5
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