The Tempest - Prospero

Charachter Quotations 

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Although his affection is questionable, to Miranda he shows love and tenderness.
"I have done nothing but in care of thee/...my daughter"
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He shows similar love towards Ariel, his 'slave'.
"Do you love me, Master?" "Dearly, my delicate Ariel"
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His affections often cause confusion for the viewers, as he also uses vicious language towards Ariel.
"..malignant thing! Has thou forgot/The foul witch Sycorax" - he is doubting Ariel's loyalties.
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The relationship he has with Miranda is built only on love, which is shown my the way she addresses him.
"My dearest father"
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He wishes to control Miranda.
"obey and be attentive"
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Although viewers see him as evil, he loves her very much.
"I have done nothing but in care of thee, my dear one"
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When he tells her that he has been exiled from Italy, we see Miranda's relentless and passionate youth.
"O the heaven!.. Alack, for pity!"
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The viewer's see a tender, but also astonishingly one-sided relationship.
"Dost thou attend me?" - this shows his possessive nature, perhaps?
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The difference in the tone of language which he uses when talking to Miranda and his brother, portrays how much he loves M.
"heaven" and "thou did/st smile" in comparison to "perfidious" and "fake"
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Some stage directions signify his status.
"Sit down", however he later joins her. He sees them as having an equal status.
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The test to Ferdinand, shows his protective and loving nature.
"They are both in either's pow'rs: but this swift buisness/ I mud uneasy make, test to light winning/ Make the prize light" - Father's instinct, he doesn't want her hurt.
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A controlling villian? With Ariel he is strict, but he is treated mostly with love.
"Do you love me, Master?" "Dearly, my delicate Ariel"
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Sympathy is created with Ariel due to his timid replies.
"No, Sir"
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Prospero shows harshness towards Caliban, which highlights his villainous qualities.
Altough he did try to **** Miranda: "Thou didst seek to violate/ The honour of my child"
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The brutal language to Caliban seems unnecessarily severe.
"Thou most lying slave/Whom stripes may more, not kindness"
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It appears that Prospero gains pleasure out of Caliban's suffering.
"Fill all thy bones with Aches" - It is an interesting psychological truth that it is easier to hurt people if we debase them in our own minds. One of the simplest ways of doing this is using language to diminish the person.
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Prospero describes Caliban using non-human metaphors.
"hag-seed" and "litter - short step towards him as a subhuman.
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MICHAEL JACOBS - 'Shakespeare on the couch'. He states that what is being portrayed here is not familiar to other fathers in relation to their daughters.
Jacobs points out that Prospero, has a similar problem which is found in all four of Shakespeare's last plays - the problem of wondering if any man is good enough for the heroines in the play.
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MICHAEL JACOBS
He comments; "Prospero reversed oedipal desires are evidently in his obsessive interested in the sexuality of Miranda and Ferdinand". There is repression of sexuality when "Prospero initially restricts M and F love to platonic, chess sex"
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My view is similar to 'Sokol'.
He suggests that Prospero is simply just looking out for his daughter - it's hard for parents to let go of their offspring, to allow them to enter into relationships.
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Other cards in this set

Card 2

Front

"Do you love me, Master?" "Dearly, my delicate Ariel"

Back

He shows similar love towards Ariel, his 'slave'.

Card 3

Front

"..malignant thing! Has thou forgot/The foul witch Sycorax" - he is doubting Ariel's loyalties.

Back

Preview of the back of card 3

Card 4

Front

"My dearest father"

Back

Preview of the back of card 4

Card 5

Front

"obey and be attentive"

Back

Preview of the back of card 5
View more cards

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