The Tempest: Literary Criticism

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  • Created by: BWD
  • Created on: 08-12-13 14:59
Stephen Orgel
Prospero's magic may be said to 'bring about reconciliation', but he is also 'deeply implicated in the usurpation' of his own dukedom, and Antonio and Sebastian's attempted overthrow of Alonso.
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Barbara Mowat
Shaekspeare draws on a tradition of magic and superstition in works such as Dr Faustus.
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Simon Palfrey: Form
Prose may empower the characters, as they are not confined to the constraints of iambic pentametre.
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Simon Palfrey: Ariel
Ariel sumbolises the transition from words to physicality, as s/he is the physical embodiment of words and has the power to become all things.
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Anne Righter
Prospero is 'obtuse' due to the lack of emotional soliloquies, meaning the audience has little insight into his intentions and feelings.
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Frank Kermode: Magic
Magic is the 'disciplined exercise of virtuous knowledge'.
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Frank Kermode: Colonialism
The Tempest could have been written without the discovery of America.
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Emma Smith: Last Play?
Symbolline or Winter's Tale could have been written later. Shakespeare didn't know it would be his last play, and he is only connected to Prospero by the 'art'/magic.
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Emma Smith: Epilogue
This is intended to dissolve the illusions, and the change from iambic pentametre evokes an incantatory tone.
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Emma Smith: Miranda's Marriage
Prospero's protection of her 'virgin knot' may be because of the political importance of the marriage, rather than any concern for his daughter.
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Jonathan Miller
It is difficult for the modern audience to feel sympathy for Prospero.
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Virginia and Alden Vaughan
Colonialism is embedded in the language of the play.
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Beverly Birch
'Punishment should go no further than repentance'.
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Edward Dowden: Reconciliation
'No life is ever lived which does not need to receive as well as to render forgiveness.'
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Edward Dowden: Epilogue
There is nothing of 'profound significance' in the epilogue.
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Peter Greenaway
In his dramatisation of the play. Prospero speaks all the lines.
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Card 2

Front

Shaekspeare draws on a tradition of magic and superstition in works such as Dr Faustus.

Back

Barbara Mowat

Card 3

Front

Prose may empower the characters, as they are not confined to the constraints of iambic pentametre.

Back

Preview of the back of card 3

Card 4

Front

Ariel sumbolises the transition from words to physicality, as s/he is the physical embodiment of words and has the power to become all things.

Back

Preview of the back of card 4

Card 5

Front

Prospero is 'obtuse' due to the lack of emotional soliloquies, meaning the audience has little insight into his intentions and feelings.

Back

Preview of the back of card 5
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