The structure of the atmosphere

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Troposphere
Zone closest to the Earth. Most weather takes place here. Highest temperatures due to solar radiation. Air temperature drops by 6.4 degrees every 1000m up. Wind speed increases with altitude due to less frictional drag. Most unstable layer.
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Tropopause
This isothermal layer where the temperature remains constant as altitude increases. It marks the upper limit of the zone of weather and climate. Separates the Troposphere and the Stratosphere.
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Stratosphere
Characterised by its steady increase in temperature (temperature inversion) as a result of absorption of solar radiation by the ozone layer. The ozone absorbs UV radiation. The atmosphere is thinner in this zone as pressure decreases with height.
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Stratopause
Wind speeds decrease with height towards it. It is an isothermal layer. Separates the Stratosphere and the Mesosphere.
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Mesosphere
Temp declines rapidly to -90 degrees as there is no water vapour or dust to absorb radiation. Characterised by very strong winds (3,000 km/h).
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Mesopause
An isothermal layer that separates the Mesosphere and the Thermosphere.
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Theremosphere
Named because of the increase in temperature resulting from the absorption of UV radiation by atomic oxygen found at this altitude.
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Card 2

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Tropopause

Back

This isothermal layer where the temperature remains constant as altitude increases. It marks the upper limit of the zone of weather and climate. Separates the Troposphere and the Stratosphere.

Card 3

Front

Stratosphere

Back

Preview of the front of card 3

Card 4

Front

Stratopause

Back

Preview of the front of card 4

Card 5

Front

Mesosphere

Back

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