The motives, aims and roles of the leaders at the Paris Peace Conference

HideShow resource information
Georges Clemenceau- Prime Minister of France
Clemenceau was under pressure by the public to make Germany suffer. He didn't want Germany to strengthen, and then attack France, so he decided that he wanted a harsh treaty, so they would cripple and not threaten France again.
1 of 6
Woodrow Wilson- President of USA
Wilson believed Germany was to blame for starting the war, but thought they should not be too harsh on Germany as they would seek revenge later. His two important ideas were: self-determination and international co-operation.
2 of 6
Some of the Fourteen Points
no secret treaties, reduce armed forces, a league of Nations to be set up to settle disputes.
3 of 6
David Lloyd George- Prime Minister of Britain
He wanted Germany to be 'justly' punished, as a harsh one would encourage Germany to seek revenge. He didn't agree with Wilson or Clemenceau, he found himself in the middle of their ideas.
4 of 6
what does self determination mean?
the right of nations to rule themselves
5 of 6
what does international co-operation mean?
countries working together to settle disputes, usually by peaceful means
6 of 6

Other cards in this set

Card 2

Front

Wilson believed Germany was to blame for starting the war, but thought they should not be too harsh on Germany as they would seek revenge later. His two important ideas were: self-determination and international co-operation.

Back

Woodrow Wilson- President of USA

Card 3

Front

no secret treaties, reduce armed forces, a league of Nations to be set up to settle disputes.

Back

Preview of the back of card 3

Card 4

Front

He wanted Germany to be 'justly' punished, as a harsh one would encourage Germany to seek revenge. He didn't agree with Wilson or Clemenceau, he found himself in the middle of their ideas.

Back

Preview of the back of card 4

Card 5

Front

the right of nations to rule themselves

Back

Preview of the back of card 5
View more cards

Comments

No comments have yet been made

Similar History resources:

See all History resources »See all The interwar years in Europe resources »