The Man of Mode - Etherage - quotations

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Medley. Description of Harriet. Objectifying
"A fine, easy, clean shape... her features regular... large wanton eyes"
1 of 18
Medley and Dorimant. About letter from Loviet. Comment on ****-social hierarchy, Dorimant's power as the rake figure
Medley: "Prithee, read it" Dorimant: "No, but if you will take the pains you may".
2 of 18
Young Bellair. Shows his respect for Dorimant. Also links to Weber's point about D's appearence, the importance of public image.
"No man in town has a better fancy in his clothes than you have"
3 of 18
Dorimant. About the nature of women in love. Sex is seen as a conquest, women as easily swayed with perseverance.
"These young women apprehend loving as much as the young men do fighting at first; but once entered, like them too, they all turn bullies straight"
4 of 18
Dorimant. On his friendship with Y. Bellair. Links to ****-social power play again, also idea that friendships are for public display, also that Dorimant is obsessed with his rake image.
"It makes the women think the better of his understanding, and judge more favorably of my reputation"
5 of 18
Mrs Loviet. About Dorimant. Links to Weber pre-restoration association between sex and As the rake figure he creates mass infatuation, there is also a sense of 'treat them mean keep them keen' which is evident in Willmore's character in The Rover.
"I know he is a devil, but he has something of the angel yet undefaced in him"
6 of 18
Belinda. About Dorimant. Links to his ability to woo women, he is almost a threat in this sense.
"...they say he has a way so bewitching that few can defend themselves from him"
7 of 18
Dorimant, to Belinda. Links to his predetor like nature and his treatment of sexual fulfillment as something which he will hunt down, links to Rochester's poetry. Also women as conquestions/ prey
I will "hunt you i'the park, trace you i'the mall, dog you at every visit you make, haunt you at the plays..."
8 of 18
Medley. First greeting to Dorimant. Homosocial relationships, links to sin.
"Dorimant, my life, my joy, my darling sin."
9 of 18
Song sung by Busy to Harriet, which she states she has "liked so much" since she has met Mr Dorimant. Interesting technique which crops up in other texts. Links to idea that Dorimant hunts women.
"When Amintas charmed my heart/ my heedless sheep began to stray / the wolves soon stole the greatest part / and all will now be made a prey"
10 of 18
Y. Bellair and Harriet, pretending to be in love. Links to idea that love is something which can be mimicked and not necessarily felt. Also to public and private sphere arguments.
Y Bellair: "Now for the look at gestures that may persuade 'em I am saying all the passionate things imaginable"
11 of 18
Harriet's direction to Y. Bellair during pretend love scene.
"Your head a little more on one side, ease yourself on your left leg, and play with your right hand"
12 of 18
Dialogue between Dorimant and Belinda. Shows D's forcefulness, ability to persuade.
D: "Swear you will" B:"I dare not", D: "Swear I say", B: "By my life, by all the happiness I hope for - " D: "You will." B: "I will".
13 of 18
Dorimant. On falling for his friend's mistresses. Links to Weber's point about love being a conquest of sorts for the rake figure.
"There is no charm so infallibly makes me fall in love with a woman as knowing a friend loves her"
14 of 18
Lady Woodvill, on Dorimant. He is a threat, a predator, posing an issue for the innocence of her daughter and other virgins in the area.
"He is the prince of all the devils in town, delights in nothing but rapes and riots/ oh! He has a tongue they say would tempt the angels to a second fall".
15 of 18
Song sung by Busy, (second), metephor for the stealing of innocence.
"None ever had so strange an art, his passion to convey, into a listening virgin's heart and steal her soul away"
16 of 18
Medley, at the end, praising Dorimant. This goes back to the idea that being a rake is very much about having power in homosocial circles also.
"Dorimant! I pronounce thy reputation clear - smd henceforth when i would know anything of women, I will consult no other oracle".
17 of 18
Epilogue. Links to idea of what it means to be a man of mode - it is more about public image than private desires
"His various modes from various fathers follow"
18 of 18

Other cards in this set

Card 2

Front

Medley and Dorimant. About letter from Loviet. Comment on ****-social hierarchy, Dorimant's power as the rake figure

Back

Medley: "Prithee, read it" Dorimant: "No, but if you will take the pains you may".

Card 3

Front

Young Bellair. Shows his respect for Dorimant. Also links to Weber's point about D's appearence, the importance of public image.

Back

Preview of the front of card 3

Card 4

Front

Dorimant. About the nature of women in love. Sex is seen as a conquest, women as easily swayed with perseverance.

Back

Preview of the front of card 4

Card 5

Front

Dorimant. On his friendship with Y. Bellair. Links to ****-social power play again, also idea that friendships are for public display, also that Dorimant is obsessed with his rake image.

Back

Preview of the front of card 5
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