The Haber Process

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What are the feedstocks for the Haber Process?
Nitrogen and hydrogen
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How is the nitrogen obtained?
From the air, which is 78% nitrogen
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Where does the hydrogen come from?
Cracking of chemicals in natural gas using steam
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Is this reaction reversible or irreversible?
Reversible
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Fromm being this, what does it mean?
Not all the nitrogen and hydrogen will convert to ammonia
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Can this reaction reach equilibrium and why?
It can't reach equilibrium, this is because the gases don't stay in the reaction vessel long enough
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What happens to the nitrogen and hydrogen that don't react?
They are recycled and passes through again so none is wasted
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Why is it helpful recycling the nitrogen and oxygen?
More ammonia will be produced using the same amount of reactant
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Why do higher pressures favour the forward reaction?
There are four molecules of gas on the left-hand side, but only two moecules on the right
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The pressure is set as high as possible to ensure the best what?
Percentage yield
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Is the forward reaction, endothermic or exothermic?
Exothermic
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By being exothermic what will happen to the equilibrium if the temperature is increased?
The equilibrium will move the wrong way
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What temperature would the yield be greater at?
Lower temperature
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What is the problem with lower temperatures?
Slower rate of reactions
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Other cards in this set

Card 2

Front

How is the nitrogen obtained?

Back

From the air, which is 78% nitrogen

Card 3

Front

Where does the hydrogen come from?

Back

Preview of the front of card 3

Card 4

Front

Is this reaction reversible or irreversible?

Back

Preview of the front of card 4

Card 5

Front

Fromm being this, what does it mean?

Back

Preview of the front of card 5
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