The Falling Leaves

HideShow resource information
"...brown leaves..."
The colour imagery here shows the feeling and loss of the soldiers who have died. Because the leaves are brown, they are close to death/ dead and so are easily breakable, which represents the broken hearts of the soldiers and their families.
1 of 13
"...dropping..."
This word sounds spontaneous and shows how fast and directly they fell. It shows how easy it was.
2 of 13
"In a still afternoon..."
This is a peaceful image but doesn't fit in with what's happening.
3 of 13
"When no wind whirled them whistling to the sky..."
The alliteration emphasises the idea that the leaves are old and it is natural and easy for them to fall.
4 of 13
"...like snowflakes...like snowflakes..."
The repetition of this and the meaning reflects the writer's purpose: a) showing all soldiers are unique b) showing how many die at once (snowflakes fall in clusters) c) snowflakes melt into nothing, just like leaves fall and soldiers' lives are lost
5 of 13
"They fell like snowflakes wiping out the noon;"
This is the only complex sentence in the poem - shows this is the only time for intense and serious thought. The phrase of 'wiping out the noon' emphasises the number of leaves falling - they block out the light from the sun.
6 of 13
"...wiping out the noon;"
The semi-colon shows the switch between the leaves and now being a soldier.
7 of 13
"...wandered slowly..."
This phrase shows that she is feeling thoughtful and respectful. It could show how war is not progressing and therefore futile.
8 of 13
"...gallant multitude..."
The writer is praising the soldiers, as well as expressing how many there are.
9 of 13
"...all withering lay..."
The word 'withering' shows how she is now comparing them to dead leaves.
10 of 13
"...slain by no wind of age or pestilence..."
The word 'slain' is a harsh word and clearly stands out from the other words - it is in contrast with the gentleness of the first few lines. The phrase as a whole shows that the deaths weren't caused by natural causes like disease, but by war.
11 of 13
"...beauty strewed..."
The word beauty' suggests that they died young and the word 'strewed' shows how the lives have been thrown around carelessly, as though their lives were not important.
12 of 13
"...Flemish clay."
There were three major battles in the Flemish province of Ypres in WW1. This makes it clear that the poet is referring to the war.
13 of 13

Other cards in this set

Card 2

Front

"...dropping..."

Back

This word sounds spontaneous and shows how fast and directly they fell. It shows how easy it was.

Card 3

Front

"In a still afternoon..."

Back

Preview of the front of card 3

Card 4

Front

"When no wind whirled them whistling to the sky..."

Back

Preview of the front of card 4

Card 5

Front

"...like snowflakes...like snowflakes..."

Back

Preview of the front of card 5
View more cards

Comments

No comments have yet been made

Similar English Literature resources:

See all English Literature resources »See all AQA Anthology resources »