The Women's Suffrage Movement 1880-1914

What was the NUWSS (Suffragists)?
The National Union of Women's Suffrage Societies.
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What did the NUWSS campaign for?
Campaigned non-violently for votes for women on the same terms as men (not all women however).
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Why did some people oppose votes for women?
Women were 'too emotional to have sound political judgement'. Politics and earning money were 'men's jobs'. The government couldn't be seen to 'cave in' to women's demands.
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Why didn't the government want to grant women the parliamentary vote before 1914?
They did not want to appear weak.
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What was the reaction of the WSPU (Suffragettes) after the rejection of the Plural Voting Bill amendment of 1913?
Set fire to post boxes, churches and railway stations. Physical attacks on cabinet ministers.
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Describe the government's reaction to the WSPU protests.
Forcibly fed them in prison when they went on hunger strike. Released women who were weak from hunger strike and re-arrested them when they'd recovered. ('Cat and mouse act 1913')
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Why was the suffragette campaign successful?
Their drastic actions attracted publicity to the cause.
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Why was the suffragette campaign unsuccessful?
Their violent and extreme methods added to people's criticisms that women were emotional and could not be trusted to vote sensibly.
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Other cards in this set

Card 2

Front

What did the NUWSS campaign for?

Back

Campaigned non-violently for votes for women on the same terms as men (not all women however).

Card 3

Front

Why did some people oppose votes for women?

Back

Preview of the front of card 3

Card 4

Front

Why didn't the government want to grant women the parliamentary vote before 1914?

Back

Preview of the front of card 4

Card 5

Front

What was the reaction of the WSPU (Suffragettes) after the rejection of the Plural Voting Bill amendment of 1913?

Back

Preview of the front of card 5
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