The Role of the Father

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In Schaffer and Emerson's study, what percentage had a primary attachment to the mother?
80%
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The father is often referred to as a secondary attachment. True or False?
True
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What do Deater Deckard et al (1994) suggest?
While there tends to be lower male involvement in child-rearing it doesn't mean they are less caring (just as anxious as mothers on separation from infants)
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What did Lamb and Lewis (2003) find?
There's no difference in the attentiveness and sensitivity of mothers and fathers towards their infants
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What differences in parenting are there between mothers and fathers when children get older?
Fathers are more boisterous and engage in more games than mothers
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What did Kotelchuck (1976) find?
Infants form attachments to fathers and between the ages of 12 and 21 months show separation anxiety from fathers
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There is evidence that mothers are the 'natural' caregivers. True or false?
False
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Biological factors as to why women might play a bigger role in child rearing than men
Carries them for 9 months, breast feed
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Economic factors as to why women might play a bigger role in child rearing than men
Men go to work and have less time and opportunity to engage with children
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Political factors as to why women might play a bigger role in child rearing than men
Social convention & gender stereotypes, Fathers have shorter paternity leave
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What did OECD (2011) find?
Fathers spent 63 minutes a day looking after children which is only 18 minutes less than mothers
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Other cards in this set

Card 2

Front

The father is often referred to as a secondary attachment. True or False?

Back

True

Card 3

Front

What do Deater Deckard et al (1994) suggest?

Back

Preview of the front of card 3

Card 4

Front

What did Lamb and Lewis (2003) find?

Back

Preview of the front of card 4

Card 5

Front

What differences in parenting are there between mothers and fathers when children get older?

Back

Preview of the front of card 5
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