The Case Studies Involved in Patient-Practitioner Relationship

HideShow resource information
  • Created by: K.T.1998
  • Created on: 27-08-16 05:49
Argyle (1975)
Suggests that non-verbal communication is four times more powerful and effective than verbal communications, but it should match verbal communication.
1 of 18
Rosental (1967)
His research has shown that when a doctor used an angry tone to persuade an alcoholic to have treatment, the patient's willingness decreased markedly.
2 of 18
Russel on Facial Expressions (2005)
His research has shown that the interpretation of facial cues appears innate as humans blind from birth will still show the same emotions (e.g. smiling to denote positive emotions).
3 of 18
Russel on Appearance (2005)
His research has shown that a doctor who appears to be well dressed and tidy will be trusted more than one who is casually dressed and a little untidy.
4 of 18
McKinstry & Wang (1991)
Their research has shown that most patients preferred the doctor dressed in a formal, white coat style as this was the most professional looking.
5 of 18
McKinlay (1975)
His research has shown that only just over one-third of patients in his study understood each of the thirteen medical jargons correctly, and that this rate was higher than the doctors had anticipated.
6 of 18
Russel on Medical Jargons (2005)
Noted that when a doctor uses jargon, many patients are reluctant to stop and ask for clarifications as they do not want to be seen as being less intellectual.
7 of 18
Ley (1988)
Stated that patients tend to remember just over 50 per cent of the information given to them in a consultation.
8 of 18
Byrne & Long (1976)
Analysed about 2 500 recorded medical consultations across many countries and discovered two main styles: doctor and patient-centred.
9 of 18
Savage & Armstrong (1990)
Their research has shown that higher levels of satisfaction were recorded for the directive or doctor-centred style, particularly so for patients with physical problems.
10 of 18
Rosenhan (1973)
Discovered type II error in practitioner diagnosis which occurs when a doctor diagnoses somebody to be ill when in fact the patient is healthy.
11 of 18
Safer et al (1979)
Found out three types of delay in seeking treatment: appraisal delay, illness delay and utilisation delay
12 of 18
Fallon (2010)
Noted three types of hypochondriasis: the obsessive-anxious type, depressive type and the somatoform type.
13 of 18
Gropalis et al (2013)
Noted that hypochondriacs might have faulty information processing in the brain, and that they can easily access memories of illnesses.
14 of 18
Schwenzer & Mathiak's Conclusion (2012)
Concluded that a general distrustful attitude towards familiar procedures should be considered hypochondriasis.
15 of 18
Schwenzer & Mathiak on Cognitive Bias (2012)
Reported that cognitive bias described in Gropalis et al (2013) study could be a "general" bias towards "less positive" views.
16 of 18
Turner & Reid on the Features of Münchausen Syndrome (2002)
Noted the three main features of Münchausen Syndrome: simulated illness (artificial symptoms), pathological lying (pseudologia fantastica) and wandering from place to place (peregrination).
17 of 18
Criddle (2010)
Noted three levels of Münchausen Syndrome by Proxy: mild (symptom fabrication), moderate (evidence tampering) and severe (symptom induction).
18 of 18

Other cards in this set

Card 2

Front

His research has shown that when a doctor used an angry tone to persuade an alcoholic to have treatment, the patient's willingness decreased markedly.

Back

Rosental (1967)

Card 3

Front

His research has shown that the interpretation of facial cues appears innate as humans blind from birth will still show the same emotions (e.g. smiling to denote positive emotions).

Back

Preview of the back of card 3

Card 4

Front

His research has shown that a doctor who appears to be well dressed and tidy will be trusted more than one who is casually dressed and a little untidy.

Back

Preview of the back of card 4

Card 5

Front

Their research has shown that most patients preferred the doctor dressed in a formal, white coat style as this was the most professional looking.

Back

Preview of the back of card 5
View more cards

Comments

No comments have yet been made

Similar Psychology resources:

See all Psychology resources »See all Psychology and Health resources »